Category Archives: This Site

2000 Fans on Facebook!

I’d just like to thank everyone who has become a fan of this site on Facebook. Today we reached 2000 fans!

I also wanted to let everyone else who follows this blog know about the Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/jewishgenealogy) and invite everyone to become a Fan. Fans on Facebook can post their genealogy questions to the wall, and I and now 2000 other interested people can respond to your questions.

If you’re logged into Facebook now, you can Like this blog by clicking on the Like button below:

1000 Fans on Facebook!

I want to thank all the fans of this site on Facebook, which now number 1000!

If you’re also interested in being a Fan on Facebook, you can click the Like button above (if you are logged into Facebook) or you can go to the Facebook page at:

http://www.facebook.com/jewishgenealogy 

If you’re interested in following this blog a different way, check out the Follow This Blog page, which is always accessible from one of the tabs at the top of the page.

Lastly, if you like this blog and think the information provided is useful, please tell a friend about it!

Blood and Frogs +1

[Google discontinued this feature]

You may have noticed recently that there has a been a small button popping up in Google search results and in other locations (like at the end of blog posts). This button is a new Google initiative called the +1 button that Google is trying to deploy across the Internet to help people recommend specific sites and articles. When the button is unpressed it is clear, but when you click on it it turns blue, and the number next to it increments by one. You can ‘unclick’ it also – just click it again and it will go back to being clear. You can try that below in the button I have in this post.

If you have a Google account (and are logged into it), then pressing this button for sites, articles and search results you like will actually change the search results people in your online social circle see when doing searches in Google. In other words, if a site you clicked on shows up in the search results of someone you know, it may then show up further up in the search results since Google knows that a friend (you) of the person searching liked that result. For those of you familiar with Digg or Liking on Facebook, this is a very similar concept, except it is fully integrated into Google which makes it very powerful (if you use Google).

This is still experimental, and who knows if Google will keep this feature in the long-run, but if you want give it a try you might already see it in your Google search results (it is being rolled out now to users of English-language search).

You can also try the button here:

which will add a +1 to this post, and/or you can press the button in the upper right of this page to +1 this site as a whole.

Of course, if you’re reading news posts in the future, or are looking at older posts on this site that you like, please press the +1 button at the end of each post to help increase its visibility on Google and I appreciate all the help I can get, so +1 away!

If you start using this feature here and on other genealogy sites around the web, this should increase the relevance of the search results you and your friends get online as more and more of your social network starts to contribute information (instead of it just being determined by a computer algorithm). I don’t know yet if it will also change your own search results based on the sites you click on, but I guess that doesn’t matter much since Google already knows about which sites people are visiting. Perhaps pressing +1 will rank more important than visiting the site (since you may have visited a site and not liked it).

For those interested in adding this button to your own web pages, Google has a page that will generate the code for you automatically. One thing they leave out, however, is that the link they give you will increase the count of only the page it is on, not of the site overall. For example, when this article is posted you will see it on the main page of this web site, which is different from the permanent link to this article, which is also different from the page you would see if you searched for all articles with the  ‘google’ label. If you take the code Google gives you (from the previous link) and place it on your web site (like in the top right of the page like on this web site) it will actually give a different count for each of those views since the web address is different in each case.

Originally I figured this out by looking at how Blogger (which this site runs on) was adding the +1 buttons to posts, but it turns out the ability to direct a +1 button to a specific web address is fully documented on the +1 button API page. For example, the +1 button in the top right of the page has a specified web address for the site’s home page to insure the count is for the site as a whole and not whatever page the person happens to be on at the time. Indeed each button that Google automatically adds to the bottom of each Blogger post (like on this site) links to that specific post. That’s why you can have multiple versions of the button on this page and each one is specific to the post and not to the page (which could contain multiple articles).

p.s. You’d think Google would be smart enough to come up with a name that could easily be converted into a verb. People Like things on Facebook all the time (Like in the sense clicking on the Like button for a page, post or comment) and they Digg posts on sites that support Digg. When I wrote “+1 away!” above it felt a bit contrived. +1 to Facebook and Digg for coming up with the better terms…

Five Way To Follow Blood and Frogs

I get asked often what the best way is to follow the blog, as people want to know when something new is posted. The answer is that it there are lots of options, and it really depends on you (like if you use Facebook or Twitter, if you want to receive more e-mail, etc.). You’ll notice on the top of the page there is now a link called ‘Follow This Blog‘ which will take you to a page listing five different ways to follow this blog.

The five ways to follow this blog that I describe include E-mail, Facebook, Twitter, Google Friend Connect and RSS. In many cases you might decide to utilize more than one of these options. Read the Follow This Blog page for more information.

New Genealogy Forms Posted

Thank you to all those who made suggestions for changes to my genealogy forms. The new revised forms, with the changes described in my previous post, are now live on the Forms page.

In addition to the new Ancestor Form, Family Form, Sibling Form and Ancestor Location Form, there is an all-new form called the US Immigrant Census Form. This is the first in a new series of research-oriented forms. I had originally intended to release this form after another form I am working on, but as I finished this one and I though people would find it useful, I’ve decided to post it first.

US Immigrant Census Form

The US Immigrant Census Form is intended to help those researching people who immigrated to the US during the huge influx between the 1870s and 1930s, although it is useful for those people who immigrated earlier but were living in the US during this period as well. The idea is that each census provides different information that is useful for researchers and can help you find more records.

For example, in 1900 and 1910, the census listed how many children were born to a woman, and how many were still living. You can use this information to figure out if children may have been left behind in the old country, or may have died young. While the country of origin of each person and their parents is listed in all the censuses on the form, the language spoken by each parent is collected only in 1920. This can sometimes be more useful than the country of origin which is frequently vague – ‘Russia’ for example is not a very useful country to have listed in a census form as it could correspond to over a dozen countries that were part of the Russian Empire during those years. From 1900 on the naturalization status of each person is listed in the census, but in 1920 the actual year the person was naturalized is recorded. These bits of information are all very useful for researchers who are looking to use census records as a springboard to getting more information on immigrants to the US.

Thank you to Michael Goldstein who had an early look at the census form and reminded me to add the Military Service field.

As always, please let me know what you think of the forms, and if there are any improvements you’d like to see please post them in the comments.

So go check out the now-improved B&F Forms System.