Rzeszów - 1899

Communities tied to Rzeszów (Reisha), Poland via marriage

You might be wondering how communities could be tied to a town via marriage. I’ve gone through about a dozen years of marriage contracts for the Jewish community of Rzeszów, Poland (in Fond 533 in the Rzeszów Archives) from about 1898 to 1910, and looked for towns that were represented by official stamps used in the documents. Rzeszów was known as Reisha (in Yiddish among the Jewish community), and it was a major community in the Austrian province of Galicia, which was later split between Eastern Poland (where Rzeszów is located) and Western Ukraine. Much of my father’s family lived in the town during this period.

In the wedding files, there are frequently also birth certificates, showing which community one or more of the couple getting married came from originally. Thus if a man from outside of Rzeszow was marrying a woman in Rzeszów, his birth certificate would generally be included in the file. The birth certificates were stamped with a special stamp representing the Jewish community of the town the record was from (to confirm its authenticity), and those stamps are the basis of this post. Keep this in mind when searching for birth certificates from towns that have no records – did the person get married somewhere else? Did you find that marriage record yet? The marriage certificates would generally be stamped as well, but by the officiating rabbi. Over those dozen years there are close to a hundred towns represented, and over 50 rabbis. Obviously many of these towns (and rabbis) repeat. Not surprisingly, the towns that are larger and closer tend to repeat more frequently.

Below you’ll see all the stamps. Click on any image to load the full size image so you can see it better (you’ll need to go Back to get back to the list). For towns in Poland, I’ve linked the town name to the page for that town in the B&F Compendium of Jewish Genealogy. Keep in mind that this list is in no way comprehenive. It is just suggestive of which communities the Jewish community of Rzeszów were most connected to via marriage during those years. It might be possible to do a more scientific study of the records and generate statistics on which communities married which other communities, but that’s for someone else to do. It was also very common in Galicia during this period for Jews to marry religiously without a civil marriage, and these records only show the civil marriages, so these are not the only towns, but the towns in which people married someone in Rzeszów that a civil record exists.

For each town that stamps exist for I have posted each stamp. If the same stamp repeats (which happens often) I only show it once. If the stamp changes, I show the new stamp. The same for the rabbi’s stamps, which also change occasionally.

Did you have family from any of these towns? Did anyone in your family live in Rzeszów, or marry someone from Rzeszów? Tell your story in the comments.

Baranów Sandomierski - 1898
Baranów Sandomierski – 1898
Błażowa - 1897
Błażowa – 1897
Błażowa - 1904
Błażowa – 1904
Bochnia - 1899
Bochnia – 1899
Bochnia Rabbinate – 1899
Borysław (now Boryslav, Ukraine) - 1898
Borysław (now Boryslav, Ukraine) – 1898
Borysław (now Boryslav, Ukraine) - 1906
Borysław (now Boryslav, Ukraine) – 1906
Brezany - 1907
Brezany – 1907
Brody (now Ukraine) - 1901
Brody (now Ukraine) – 1901
Brzesko - 1908
Brzesko – 1908
Brzesko - 1908 - Rabbi Tobias Lipshitz
Brzesko – 1908 – Rabbi Tobias Lipshitz
Brzozów - 1892
Brzozów – 1892
Brzozów - 1905
Brzozów – 1905
Chrzanów - 1897
Chrzanów – 1897
Cieszanów - 1906
Cieszanów – 1906
Czernowitz (now Chernivtsi, Ukraine) - 1906
Czernowitz (now Chernivtsi, Ukraine) – 1906
Czudec - 1898
Czudec – 1898
Czudec - 1908 - Rabbi Mozes Herzig
Czudec – 1908 – Rabbi Mozes Herzig
Dąbrowa Tarnowska - 1906
Dąbrowa Tarnowska – 1906
Dębica - 1896
Dębica – 1896
Dębica - 1906
Dębica – 1906
Dębica - 1906 - Rabbi Samuel Horowitz
Dębica – 1906 – Rabbi Samuel Horowitz
Dobromil (now Dobromyl, Ukraine) - 1901
Dobromil (now Dobromyl, Ukraine) – 1901
Dobromil (now Dobromyl, Ukraine) - 1901 - Rabbi Abraham Markus Rimald
Dobromil (now Dobromyl, Ukraine) – 1901 – Rabbi Abraham Markus Rimald
Drohobycz (now in Ukraine) - 1884
Drohobycz (now in Ukraine) – 1884
Drohobycz (now in Ukraine) - 1896
Drohobycz (now in Ukraine) – 1896
Dukla - 1899
Dukla – 1899
Dynów - 1899
Dynów – 1899
Dynów - 1910
Dynów – 1910
Frysztak - 1910
Frysztak – 1910
Głogów Małopolski - 1892
Głogów Małopolski – 1892
Głogów Małopolski - 1906 - Rabbi Moses Rubin
Głogów Małopolski – 1906 – Rabbi Moses Rubin
Głogów Małopolski - 1908 - Rabbi Moses Rubin
Głogów Małopolski – 1908 – Rabbi Moses Rubin
Gorlice - 1896
Gorlice – 1896
Gorlice - 1899
Gorlice – 1899
Gorlice - 1904 - Rabbi Baruch Halberstam
Gorlice – 1904 – Rabbi Baruch Halberstam
Gródek - 1903 - Rabbi Osias Klieger
Gródek – 1903 – Rabbi Osias Klieger
Gródek - 1908
Gródek – 1908
Gródek - 1908 - Rabbi Josef Kliger
Gródek – 1908 – Rabbi Josef Kliger
Hussaków (now Husakiv, Ukraine) - 1908
Hussaków (now Husakiv, Ukraine) – 1908
Jarosław - 1895
Jarosław – 1895
Jarosław - 1906
Jarosław – 1906
Jarosław - 1906 - Rabbinate
Jarosław – 1906 – Rabbinate
Jasło - 1896
Jasło – 1896
Jasło - 1897 - Rabbi Hersch Josef Rubin
Jasło – 1897 – Rabbi Hersch Josef Rubin
Jasło - 1900 - Rabbi Hersch Josef Rubin
Jasło – 1900 – Rabbi Hersch Josef Rubin
Jasło - 1904
Jasło – 1904
Jasło - 1906
Jasło – 1906
Jasło - 1910 - Rabbi Meilech Rubin
Jasło”>Jasło – 1910 – Rabbi Meilech Rubin
Jaworow (now Yavoriv, Ukraine) - 1900
Jaworow (now Yavoriv, Ukraine) – 1900
Kalusz (now Kalush, Ukraine) - 1900 - Rabbi Isak Babad
Kalusz (now Kalush, Ukraine) – 1900 – Rabbi Isak Babad
Kamionce (now Kamianka-Buzka, Ukraine) - 1906
Kamionce (now Kamianka-Buzka, Ukraine) – 1906
Kańczuga - 1900
Kańczuga – 1900
Kańczuga - 1906
Kańczuga – 1906
Kańczuga - 1907 - Rabbi Benzion Westreich
Kańczuga – 1907 – Rabbi Benzion Westreich
Klasno - 1905
Klasno – 1905
Klasno - 1908 - Rabbi Schmelke Frankel
Klasno – 1908 – Rabbi Schmelke Frankel
Kolomea (now Kolmyia, Ukraine) - 1897
Kolomea (now Kolmyia, Ukraine) – 1897
Kolomea (now Kolmyia, Ukraine) - 1897 - Rabbi Jacob Thumim
Kolomea (now Kolmyia, Ukraine) – 1897 – Rabbi Jacob Thumim
Kraków - 1895
Kraków – 1895
Kraków - 1907
Kraków – 1907
Kraków - 1907 - Rabbinate
Kraków – 1907 – Rabbinate
Kraków - 1910 - Rabbi Dr. Ozyasz Twon
Kraków – 1910 – Rabbi Dr. Ozyasz Twon
Krakowiec (now Krakovets, Ukraine) - 1897
Krakowiec (now Krakovets, Ukraine) – 1897
Krzywcza - 1910
Krzywcza – 1910
Łańcut - 1896
Łańcut – 1896
Łańcut - 1907
Łańcut – 1907
Łańcut - 1907 - Rabbi Simche Spira
Łańcut – 1907 – Rabbi Simche Spira
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1881
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1881
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1896
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1896
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1896 - Rabbi Dr. Jecheskiel Caro
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1896 – Rabbi Dr. Jecheskiel Caro
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1896 - Rabbi Dr. S. Guttman
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1896 – Rabbi Dr. S. Guttman
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1903 - Rabbi Alexander Halpern
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1903 – Rabbi Alexander Halpern
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1908
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1908
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1908 - Rabbi Leib Braude
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1908 – Rabbi Leib Braude
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) - 1910 - Rabbi Dr. Jecheskiel Caro
Lemberg/Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) – 1910 – Rabbi Dr. Jecheskiel Caro
Leżajsk - 1888
Leżajsk – 1888
Leżajsk - Samuel Birnbaum - 1910
Leżajsk – Samuel Birnbaum – 1910
Lipsko - 1906
Lipsko – 1906
Lisko (now Lisok, Ukraine) - 1910
Lisko (now Lisok, Ukraine) – 1910
Lubaczów - 1904
Lubaczów – 1904
Lubaczów - 1906
Lubaczów – 1906
Mielec - 1896
Mielec – 1896
Mielec - 1909 - Rabbi Naftali Horowitz
Mielec – 1909 – Rabbi Naftali Horowitz
Mielnica (now Melnytsia-Podilska, Ukraine) - 1908
Mielnica (now Melnytsia-Podilska, Ukraine) – 1908
Mosciska (now Mostyska, Ukraine) - 1906
Mosciska (now Mostyska, Ukraine) – 1906
Mosciska (now Mostyska, Ukraine) - 1909 - Rabbi Chaim N. Halberstam
Mosciska (now Mostyska, Ukraine) – 1909 – Rabbi Chaim N. Halberstam
Mosciska (now Mostyska, Ukraine) - 1909
Mosciska (now Mostyska, Ukraine) – 1909
Muszyna - 1908
Muszyna – 1908
Myślenice - 1907
Myślenice – 1907
Myślenice - 1910 - Rabbi Josef S. Perlman
Myślenice – 1910 – Rabbi Josef S. Perlman
Niebylec - 1892
Niebylec – 1892
Niebylec - 1906
Niebylec – 1906
Niebylec - 1908
Niebylec – 1908
Nisko - 1906
Nisko – 1906
Nowemiasto - 1906 - Rabbi Moses Kreitstein
Nowemiasto – 1906 – Rabbi Moses Kreitstein
Nowy Sącz - 1902
Nowy Sącz – 1902
Nowy Sącz - 1907 - Rabbinate
Nowy Sącz – 1907 – Rabbinate
Nowy Targ - 1909
Nowy Targ – 1909
Nowy Wiśnicz - 1910
Nowy Wiśnicz – 1910
Oleszyce - 1904
Oleszyce – 1904
Oleszyce - 1910
Oleszyce – 1910
Ołpiny - 1902
Ołpiny – 1902
Pilzno - 1907
Pilzno – 1907
Podgórze - 1905
Podgórze – 1905
Podgórze - 1906
Podgórze – 1906
Podgórze - 1909 - Rabbi Jakob Frankel
Podgórze – 1909 – Rabbi Jakob Frankel
Preworsk - 1906 - Rabbi Hersch Aschkenasy
Preworsk – 1906 – Rabbi Hersch Aschkenasy
Pruchnik - 1900
Pruchnik – 1900
Przemyśl - 1896 - Gedalje Schmelkes
Przemyśl – 1896 – Gedalje Schmelkes
Przemyśl - 1900 - Rabbi Nathan Hebenstreit
Przemyśl – 1900 – Rabbi Nathan Hebenstreit
Przemyśl - 1902
Przemyśl – 1902
Przemyśl - 1904 - Rabbi Nathan Hebenstreit
Przemyśl – 1904 – Rabbi Nathan Hebenstreit
Przemyśl - 1905 - Rabbinate
Przemyśl – 1905 – Rabbinate
Przeworsk - 1895
Przeworsk – 1895
Przeworsk - 1906
Przeworsk – 1906
Radomyśl nad Sanem - 1907
Radomyśl nad Sanem – 1907
Radomyśl Wielki - 1909
Radomyśl Wielki – 1909
Radymno - 1901 - Rabbi Samuel Spira
Radymno – 1901 – Rabbi Samuel Spira
Radymno - 1902
Radymno – 1902
Radymno - 1906
Radymno – 1906
Radymno - 1906 - Rabbinate
Radymno – 1906 – Rabbinate
Ropczyce - 1897
Ropczyce – 1897
Ropczyce - 1897
Ropczyce – 1897
Ropczyce - 1904 - Rabbi Mendel Moriles
Ropczyce – 1904 – Rabbi Mendel Moriles
Ropczyce - 1905
Ropczyce – 1905
Rorczcach - 1894
Rorczcach – 1894
Rozwadow (now part of Stalowa Wola) - 1906
Rozwadow (now part of Stalowa Wola) – 1906
Rozwadow (now part of Stalowa Wola) - 1907
Rozwadow (now part of Stalowa Wola) – 1907
Rudnik - 1897 - Rabbi Hersch Halberstam
Rudnik – 1897 – Rabbi Hersch Halberstam
Rudnik - 1901
Rudnik – 1901
Rudnik - 1906 - Rabbi Hersch Halberstam
Rudnik – 1906 – Rabbi Hersch Halberstam
Rymanów - 1892
Rymanów – 1892
Rymanów - 1905
Rymanów – 1905
Rzeszów - 1870
Rzeszów – 1870
Rzeszów - 1880
Rzeszów – 1880
Rzeszów - 1890
Rzeszów – 1890
Rzeszów - 1895 - Rabbi O.H. Wallerstein
Rzeszów – 1895 – Rabbi O.H. Wallerstein
Rzeszów - 1896 - Rabbi Chaim Wolf Ellenbogen
Rzeszów – 1896 – Rabbi Chaim Wolf Ellenbogen
Rzeszów - 1897 - Rabbi O.H. Walirstein
Rzeszów – 1897 – Rabbi O.H. Walirstein
Rzeszów - 1899
Rzeszów – 1899
Rzeszów - 1904 - Rabbi Dr. N. H. Bau
Rzeszów – 1904 – Rabbi Dr. N. H. Bau
Rzeszów - 1906 - Rabbi Natan Lewin
Rzeszów – 1906 – Rabbi Natan Lewin
Sambor (now Sambir, Ukraine) - 1903
Sambor (now Sambir, Ukraine) – 1903
Sambor (now Sambir, Ukraine) - 1908 - Rabbi Aron Lewin
Sambor (now Sambir, Ukraine) – 1908 – Rabbi Aron Lewin
Sanok - 1896 - Rabbi Nathan Jacob Dym
Sanok – 1896 – Rabbi Nathan Jacob Dym
Sanok - 1901
Sanok – 1901
Sanok - 1908
Sanok – 1908
Sędziszów Małopolski - 1896
Sędziszów Małopolski – 1896
Sędziszów Małopolski - 1904 - Rabbi Tobias Horowitz
Sędziszów Małopolski – 1904 – Rabbi Tobias Horowitz
Sieniawa - 1900
Sieniawa – 1900
Sieniawa - 1910 - Rabbi Meilech Bindiger
Sieniawa – 1910 – Rabbi Meilech Bindiger
Skała - 1901
Skała – 1901
Skole (now in Ukraine) - 1906 - Rabbi Isak Moses Rothenberg
Skole (now in Ukraine) – 1906 – Rabbi Isak Moses Rothenberg
Sokal (now in Ukraine) - 1909
Sokal (now in Ukraine) – 1909
Sokołów Małopolski - 1893
Sokołów Małopolski – 1893
Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine) - 1897 - Rabbi Isaac Horowitz
Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine) – 1897 – Rabbi Isaac Horowitz
Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine) - 1903
Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine) – 1903
Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine) - 1906 - Rabbi L. Horowitz
Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine) – 1906 – Rabbi L. Horowitz
Stara Sol (now Stara Sil, Ukraine) - 1907
Stara Sol (now Stara Sil, Ukraine) – 1907
Stara Sol (now Stara Sil, Ukraine) - 1908 - Rabbi David Reiss
Stara Sol (now Stara Sil, Ukraine) – 1908 – Rabbi David Reiss
Stryj (now Stryi, Ukraine) - 1895
Stryj (now Stryi, Ukraine) – 1895
Stryj (now Stryi, Ukraine) - 1906
Stryj (now Stryi, Ukraine) – 1906
Stryj (now Stryi, Ukraine) - 1906 - Rabbi Schulem Jolles
Stryj (now Stryi, Ukraine) – 1906 – Rabbi Schulem Jolles
Strzyżów - 1897
Strzyżów – 1897
Strzyżów - 1900
Strzyżów – 1900
Strzyżów - 1903 - Rabbi Alter Horowitz
Strzyżów – 1903 – Rabbi Alter Horowitz
Tarnobrzeg - 1906
Tarnobrzeg – 1906
Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine) - 1890
Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine) – 1890
Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine) - 1907
Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine) – 1907
Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine) - 1908 - Rabbi Simon Babad
Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine) – 1908 – Rabbi Simon Babad
Tarnów - 1896
Tarnów – 1896
Tarnów - 1901 - Rabbi Abraham Schnur
Tarnów – 1901 – Rabbi Abraham Schnur
Tarnów - 1904 - Rabbi Abraham Schnur
Tarnów – 1904 – Rabbi Abraham Schnur
Tarnów - 1906 - Rabbinate
Tarnów – 1906 – Rabbinate
Turka (now in Ukraine) - 1909 - Rabbi Leizer Mischel
Turka (now in Ukraine) – 1909 – Rabbi Leizer Mischel
Turka (now in Ukraine) - 1909
Turka (now in Ukraine) – 1909
Tyczyn - 1894
Tyczyn – 1894
Ulanów - 1900
Ulanów – 1900
Ulanów - 1908
Ulanów – 1908
Ustrzyki Dolne - 1904
Ustrzyki Dolne – 1904
Ustrzyki Dolne - 1910 - Rabbi Josef Reinmann
Ustrzyki Dolne – 1910 – Rabbi Josef Reinmann
Wielopole Skrzyńskie - 1899
Wielopole Skrzyńskie – 1899
Wien (Vienna), Austria - 1901 - Rabbinate
Wien (Vienna), Austria – 1901 – Rabbinate
Wien (Vienna), Austria - 1903
Wien (Vienna), Austria – 1903
Wien (Vienna), Austria - 1909
Wien (Vienna), Austria – 1909
Wiznitz (now Vyzhnytsia, Ukraine) - 1910
Wiznitz (now Vyzhnytsia, Ukraine) – 1910
Wojnicz - 1903
Wojnicz – 1903
Zablotow (now Zabolotiv, Ukraine) - 1897 - Rabbi Mendel Hager
Zablotow (now Zabolotiv, Ukraine) – 1897 – Rabbi Mendel Hager
Żołynia - 1893
Żołynia – 1893
Żołynia - 1901 - Rabbi Elias Horowitz
Żołynia – 1901 – Rabbi Elias Horowitz
Żołynia - 1909
Żołynia – 1909

Practical suggestions when photographing cemeteries

Yesterday I arrived in Warsaw for the 2018 IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy. After dropping off my bags at the hotel, I headed straight to the Okopowa St. Cemetery to start photographing the gravestones (as part of the Okopowa St. Project). This was the first time I had visited this cemetery in 25 years (you can see some of the photographs I took then in my article on Jewish Gravestone Symbols).

I wanted to share my experience going to photograph this cemetery, and offer advice that will be useful for other participants in the Okopowa St. Project, but also anyone looking to document cemeteries (and indeed the point of the Okopowa St. Project is to develop best-practices to use for other cemetery documentation projects).

My first advice is simply to dress appropriately for trudging through a cemetery. When I mentioned this to someone yesterday, they asked if I meant for purposes of modesty (tziut in Hebrew). That’s not what I mean. It’s possible, particularly in some cemeteries in Israel, that you may be required to dress modestly when entering a cemetery. My primary concern, however, particularly in an old cemetery like the one in Warsaw, where gravestones are falling over and there is a lot of vegetation growing around, and sometimes on, the graves, is that you need good shoes and long pants, as you will be walking on uneven ground and stepping over branches and other obstructions, possible dealing with mud, etc. Wear a hat and use sunscreen. Some good bug spray with DEET is also recommended.

Before going to the cemetery, do some research on what is known about it. Are there maps of the cemetery that will help you navigate the grounds? In the case of the Okopowa St. Cemetery, there are several somewhat-conflicting maps (as shown in my earlier article Okopowa St. Cemetery Maps and Statistics). Bring a map with you if you can. If there is no map, then think about tracking where you go to help create a map. It’s worth showing this image of the cemetery overlaid with the path I walked in the cemetery:

The important thing to notice in this map is the dense area on the bottom right. That shows me walking back and forth along the rows in the first half or so of section 1 in the cemetery. After doing that for some time, I then took a walk around other sections of the cemetery and back to the entrance.

Note that when walking in that section, the lines overlap a lot. That’s because there is no walking in a straight line in that section. Besides trees, some graves are surrounding by fences that block one from walking in some areas, and you end up needing to go back, walk around to the other side, take pictures, then go back around to where you started.

One of the main reasons I elected to use BillionGraves is its ability to link multiple photographs of the same grave. Looking at gravestone photos, I frequently want photos from different angles, or close up photos of the text, etc. Unless the text is very clear and takes up most of the gravestone surface, I like to take at least two photos of each grave – one of the entire gravestone showing the surrounding area, and one close up photo of the text. Here’s a video showing how I do this using the BillionGraves app:

There’s another reason to have multiple photos of a single gravestone, and that’s when the gravestone has text on different surfaces. Let me give an example. It’s not uncommon with Jewish gravestones to have both Hebrew and another language on the stone. Sometimes those texts are on opposite sides of the same stone. In that case you might find a photograph of a gravestone, and not realize there is more text on the opposite side. Here’s an example in the Okopowa St. Cemetery. Below is a photograph of a gravestone on the existing database of burials in the cemetery:

Wolk Polakiewicz gravestone from FDJCP database
Wolf Polakiewicz gravestone from FDJCP database

Now let me start with saying that the FDJCP has done an amazing job building their databases. They take the effort to extract the data from gravestones in the field, instead of doing so from photographs, which is many times difficult. They don’t, however, transcribe the entire text on gravestones, which can sometimes be useful, and certainly gives people a more personal look at their relatives than just the extracted names and dates. Note that in the FDJCP photograph, that there are two sides with text. They took a picture at an angle that allows you to see both sides. Now look at four photos I took of the same gravestone yesterday:

On the left you’ll see a photo of the entire stone. Next you’ll see the close-up photos of the two sides shown in the FDJCP photograph. I think anyone would agree that it is easier to read the text in these photos. The last photo on the right is actually a third side that has text. Considering the FDJCP’s goal is not to do transcriptions, but only to extract the important genealogical details, the fact that they don’t show a side of the gravestone with text may not matter to them, but it could matter to a relative looking for every detail possible.

I don’t fault FDJCP, quite the contrary. They’re doing amazing work with limited resources. This is, however, a good example of how we can all contribute to improving what is available.

I hope people find this useful, both for the Okopowa St. Project and for other cemetery documentation projects. If you’re photographing cemeteries this week, whether this one or others, share what you’ve learned in the comments.

Get ready to photograph – The Okopowa St. Project begins


As the Okopowa St. Project is about to begin, I wanted a way to help coordinate efforts and share experiences. While each section has a discussion group within Flickr, until now I didn’t have a single group that was easy for people to discuss the project. I’ve now set up a Facebook group for that purpose. If you are participating in the project, or even just thinking about it, please join the group and the discussion.

Also, I’m happy to announce that after discussing things with BillionGraves, we’re going to be able to extract the images from BillionGraves and make them available, even if you don’t separately upload them. This means that even if you only photograph using the BillionGraves app, and don’t manually upload the photos to Flickr, we’ll still be able to get them and make them available.

There’s a catch, however, and that’s the reason we did this, which is that BillionGraves doesn’t embed the geocoding in the images, either the ones they upload or the ones they save to the camera roll. The images are also shrunk when uploaded, so those images won’t be full quality. Therefore we still need you to register on the project on the Google Sheet, so we can figure out which sections each photograph goes to. If you can save the images to your camera roll on iPhone (or use the Android Widget feature which allows you to both upload to BillionGraves and save the photo to your camera), and then upload them to Flickr, we will still end up with better quality images for everyone, and it will make the process much easier on the backend.

We’ve also set up a registration page with BillionGraves, that lets them know you’ve come in through this project. If you haven’t signed up with BillionGraves yet, then please do so through this link. If you’ve already registered on BillionGraves, then just go to the page and sign-in through the ‘Login’ link at the bottom.

Okopowa St. Project BillionGraves registration page

Just to be clear, I am very grateful for the assistance BillionGraves is providing us, and their accommodating our needs for this project. We have no financial relationship. I only started speaking to them after the project was announced, when someone assumed I had coordinated this with them and was somehow benefitting from it. I thought to myself that while I have no interest in benefiting from this project, maybe it wasn’t such a bad idea to coordinate with BillionGraves since we were going to be using their software. They really couldn’t have been any nicer, and I am hopeful we can build on this relationship in the future as we use the knowledge gained in photographing this first cemetery, into starting more projects to do the same in other cemeteries.