Tag Archives: jri-poland

Ukrainian towns with Jewish records in Polish archives

The following table shows all collections of Jewish records in the Polish state archives that are for towns currently in Ukraine. Most of these towns were originally part of East Galicia. Each line has a link on the right side that goes to the record collection’s page in the PRADZIAD (Baza danych Program Rejestracji Akt Metrykalnych i Stanu Cywilnego, or Database Program for Registration of Metric and Civil Status Files) database, which is a list of all records in the Polish state archives, organized by town.

In addition, if JRI-Poland has a town listing for the town, I’ve added a link to that as well. Keep in mind that the PRADZIAD link goes to a description of the specific collection of records, while the JRI-Poland is a general link for the town. The JRI-Poland page should tell you if the records have been indexed by JRI-Poland.

As this is a Polish database, the town names are of course in Polish, although I’ve tried to supply the current Ukrainian name for the town. I have not added the Yiddish town names (such as Lemberg for Lwow/Lviv) although I could do that at a later date. I’m not an expert on Ukrainian towns, so it’s possible I made a mistake in assigning Ukrainian town names. If you see a mistake, please let me know.

I also could not find the current names of three of the towns listed – Janowiec, Sakała, and Ułaszkowice. It’s possible Ułaszkowice is simply a typo for Ułaszkowce. If you know the current names of these towns, please let me know.

The table below is sortable by every field, so although it is initially sorted by Polish town name, you can easily sort it by Ukrainian town name. You can also change the number of towns to show at once (it defaults to 20, although you can increase it up to 100). The table is also searchable, which is useful as there are over 500 entries in the list.

Polish Town NameUkrainian Town NameRecord TypeYearsLink
Biały KamieńBelyy KamenBirth1879, 1883-1888, 1893-1903PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Biały KamieńBelyy KamenDeath1862-1876, 1886 - 1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Biały KamieńBelyy KamenDeath1898-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BóbrkaBibrkaBirth1863-1916PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BóbrkaBibrkaBirth1916-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BóbrkaBibrkaDeath1904-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BóbrkaBibrkaMarriage1850, 1866-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BohorodczanyBohorodchanyBirth1919-1931, 1936PRADZIAD
BohorodczanyBohorodchanyDeath1919-1931, 1936PRADZIAD
BohorodczanyBohorodchanyMarriage1921-1930, 1936PRADZIAD
BolechówBolekhivBirth1877-1898, 1901-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BolechówBolekhivBirth1908-1924, 1934-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BolechówBolekhivDeath1877-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BolechówBolekhivDeath1912-1940, 1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BolechówBolekhivMarriage1877-1906PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BolechówBolekhivMarriage1917-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BołszowceBilshivtsiBirth1901-1914, 1923, 1929, 1931, 1934, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BołszowceBilshivtsiBirth1911-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BołszowceBilshivtsiDeath1901-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BołszowceBilshivtsiDeath1923, 1929, 1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BołszowceBilshivtsiMarriage1923, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorszczówBorshchivBirth1873-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorszczówBorshchivBirth1913-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorszczówBorshchivDeath1877-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorszczówBorshchivDeath1911-1928, 1935-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorszczówBorshchivMarriage1846-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorszczówBorshchivMarriage1914-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorysławBoryslavBirth1878-1886, 1888-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorysławBoryslavBirth1903PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorysławBoryslavBirth1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorysławBoryslavDeath1878-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorysławBoryslavDeath1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorysławBoryslavMarriage1886-1906, 1908-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BorysławBoryslavMarriage1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BrodyBrodyDeath1941-1942PRADZIAD
BrzeżanyBerezhanyBirth1864-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BrzeżanyBerezhanyBirth1913-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BrzeżanyBerezhanyDeath1859, 1865PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BrzeżanyBerezhanyDeath1870-1891, 1896-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BrzeżanyBerezhanyDeath1910-1922PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BrzeżanyBerezhanyMarriage1875-1897, 1907-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BuczaczBuchachBirth1849-1890PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BuczaczBuchachBirth1891-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BuczaczBuchachDeath1900-1915, 1917-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BuczaczBuchachMarriage1907-1914, 1917-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BudzanówBudanivBirth1867-1875, 1877-1896PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BudzanówBudanivBirth1898-1909PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BudzanówBudanivBirth1910-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BudzanówBudanivDeath1877-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BudzanówBudanivDeath1890-1914, 1918-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BukaczowceBukachivtsiBirth1865-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BukaczowceBukachivtsiBirth1909-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BukaczowceBukachivtsiDeath1909-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BukaczowceBukachivtsiDeath1930, 1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BukaczowceBukachivtsiMarriage1906-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BukaczowceBukachivtsiMarriage1930, 1932-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BursztynBurshtynBirth1848-1873, 1877-1912, 1923, 1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BursztynBurshtynBirth1898-VI.1914, 1918-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BursztynBurshtynDeath1848-1907, 1923, 1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BursztynBurshtynDeath1908-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BursztynBurshtynMarriage1849-1876, 1878-1908, 1923, 1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
BursztynBurshtynMarriage1909-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ChodorówKhodorivBirth1914-1926PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ChodorówKhodorivDeath1926-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ChodorówKhodorivMarriage1876-1909PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ChodorówKhodorivMarriage1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ChorostkówKhorostkivBirth1830-1871, 1874-1898PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ChorostkówKhorostkivBirth1898-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
CzortkówChortkivBirth1874-1911, 1921, 1926, 1934-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
CzortkówChortkivBirth1912-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
CzortkówChortkivDeath1884-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
CzortkówChortkivDeath1907-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
CzortkówChortkivMarriage1878-1911, 1923, 1927, 1930, 1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
CzortkówChortkivMarriage1939-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DobromilDobromylBirth1886-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DobromilDobromylBirth1886-1925PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DobromilDobromylDeath1915-1933, 1941-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DobromilDobromylDeath1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DobromilDobromylMarriage1903-1919, 1936-1937, 1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DobromilDobromylMarriage1915-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DobromilDobromylMarriage Bann1903-1919, 1936-1937, 1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DrohobyczDrohobychBirth1877-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DrohobyczDrohobychBirth1914-1939, 1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DrohobyczDrohobychDeath1852-1896, 1898-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DrohobyczDrohobychDeath1883, 1877, 1888PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DrohobyczDrohobychDeath1914-1939, 1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DrohobyczDrohobychMarriage1877-1881, 1884, 1886-1891, 1893-1897, 1899-1905, 1907-1913, 1915, 1931PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
DrohobyczDrohobychMarriage1914-1916, 1918-1934, 1936-1939, 1941-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GlinianyHlynianyBirth1860-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GlinianyHlynianyBirth1914-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GlinianyHlynianyDeath1877-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GlinianyHlynianyDeath1898-1923, 1934-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GlinianyHlynianyMarriage1877, 1899, 1902, 1907, 1909-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GlinianyHlynianyMarriage1915-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GołogóryHolohoryBirth1877-1881, 1883-1894, 1897-1905, 1909, 1911, 1927PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GołogóryHolohoryBirth1928-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GołogóryHolohoryDeath1877-1910, 1912, 1924-1926PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GołogóryHolohoryDeath1927-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GołogóryHolohoryMarriage1877-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
GołogóryHolohoryMarriage Bann1935-1939, 1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Gródek JagiellońskiHorodokBirth1870-1876, 1886-1913, 1929, 1931PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Gródek JagiellońskiHorodokBirth1932-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Gródek JagiellońskiHorodokDeath1877-1904, 1923, 1934, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Gródek JagiellońskiHorodokDeath1905-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Gródek JagiellońskiHorodokMarriage1915-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Gródek JagiellońskiHorodokMarriage1931-1932, 1935, 1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HaliczHalychBirth1923-1931PRADZIAD
HaliczHalychDeath1923-1931, 1936PRADZIAD
HaliczHalychMarriage1923-1931PRADZIAD
HorodenkaHorodenkaBirth1876-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HorodenkaHorodenkaBirth1914-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HorodenkaHorodenkaDeath1851-1881, 1887-1906PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HorodenkaHorodenkaDeath1907-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HorodenkaHorodenkaMarriage1856-1876, 1878-1905PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HorodenkaHorodenkaMarriage1906-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HusiatynHusiatynBirth1815-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
HusiatynHusiatynMarriage1820-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JagielnicaYahilnytsyaBirth1860-1880, 1888-1908, 1913, 1926-1932PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JagielnicaYahilnytsyaDeath1862-1900, 1905, 1907-1911, 1913, 1920-1923, 1926-1929, 1931-1932PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JagielnicaYahilnytsyaMarriage1874-1909, 1911-1914, 1920, 1923-1931, 1937-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanówIvanivBirth1877-1897PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanówIvanivBirth1898-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanówIvanivBirth1916-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanówIvanivDeath1877-1939, 1941-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanówIvanivDeath1916-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanówIvanivMarriage1886-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanówIvanivMarriage1918-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JanowiecBirth1858-1876PRADZIAD
Jaryczów NowyNowyj JarycziwBirth1888-1890, 1892-1893, 1896-1897, 1900, 1902-1903, 1906-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Jaryczów NowyNowyj JarycziwBirth1914-1915, 1917-1936PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Jaryczów NowyNowyj JarycziwDeath1879-1881, 1883, 1889-1892, 1899-1907, 1909, 1911-1913, 1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Jaryczów NowyNowyj JarycziwDeath1915, 1922, 1927, 1932, 1934, 1936PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Jaryczów NowyNowyj JarycziwMarriage1879, 1892, 1897PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Jaryczów NowyNowyj JarycziwMarriage1913-1914, 1916-1921, 1924-1929, 1934-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
JaworówYavorivBirth1848-1936, 1938-1939PRADZIAD
JaworówYavorivBirth1940-1941PRADZIAD
JaworówYavorivDeath1842-1915, 1939PRADZIAD
JaworówYavorivDeath1895-1942PRADZIAD
JaworówYavorivMarriage1861-1905, 1913-1924, 1939PRADZIAD
JaworówYavorivMarriage1877-1937PRADZIAD
JezierniaOzernaDeath1915-1942PRADZIAD
JezierniaOzernaMarriage1877-1939PRADZIAD
JezupolYezupilBirth1923-1931PRADZIAD
JezupolYezupilDeath1923-1931PRADZIAD
JezupolYezupilMarriage1923-1931PRADZIAD
Kamionka StrumiłowaKamianka-BuzkaBirth1859-1872, 1877-1884, 1890-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Kamionka StrumiłowaKamianka-BuzkaBirth1908-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Kamionka StrumiłowaKamianka-BuzkaDeath1789-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Kamionka StrumiłowaKamianka-BuzkaDeath1908-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Kamionka StrumiłowaKamianka-BuzkaMarriage1866-1876, 1878-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Kamionka StrumiłowaKamianka-BuzkaMarriage1910-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KołomyjaKolomyiaBirth1865-1916, 1922, 1932, 1934-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KołomyjaKolomyiaBirth1912-1928, 1930-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KołomyjaKolomyiaDeath1865-1894, 1898-1914, 1932, 1934-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KołomyjaKolomyiaDeath1912-1928, 1931-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KołomyjaKolomyiaMarriage1877-1902, 1904-1906, 1908-1913, 1915, 1932, 1934-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KołomyjaKolomyiaMarriage1909-1913, 1915-1916, 1921-1924, 1926, 1928-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KomarnoKomarnoBirth1878-1903, 1904-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KomarnoKomarnoBirth1914-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KomarnoKomarnoDeath1876, 1878-1884, 1889-1891, 1893, 1895-1898, 1900, 1905-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KomarnoKomarnoDeath1915-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KomarnoKomarnoMarriage1877-1904PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KomarnoKomarnoMarriage1877-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KopyczyńceKopychyntsiBirth1877-1896, 1901-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KopyczyńceKopychyntsiBirth1911-1928PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KopyczyńceKopychyntsiDeath1816-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KopyczyńceKopychyntsiDeath1847PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KopyczyńceKopychyntsiDeath1895-1933PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KopyczyńceKopychyntsiMarriage1850-1871PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KopyczyńceKopychyntsiMarriage1879-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KosówKosivBirth1868-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KosówKosivBirth1911-1922, 1927-1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KosówKosivDeath1877-1903PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KosówKosivDeath1904-1927PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KosówKosivMarriage1877-1896, 1899-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KosówKosivMarriage1911-1929PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozłówKozlivBirth1877-1888, 1889-1911, 1926-1928, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozłówKozlivBirth1912-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozłówKozlivDeath1877-1904, 1925-1931, 1933-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozłówKozlivDeath1905-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozłówKozlivMarriage1925PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozłówKozlivMarriage1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozowaKozovaBirth1877-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozowaKozovaBirth1911-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozowaKozovaDeath1891-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozowaKozovaDeath1908-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozowaKozovaMarriage1877-1880, 1882-1901, 1903-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KozowaKozovaMarriage1877-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrakowiecKrakovetsBirth1877-1894PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrakowiecKrakovetsBirth1909-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrakowiecKrakovetsDeath1827-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrakowiecKrakovetsDeath1897-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrakowiecKrakovetsMarriage1877-1906PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrakowiecKrakovetsMarriage1907-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrzywczeKryvcheBirth1830-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KrzywczeKryvcheDeath1818-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
KudryńceKudrynciBirth1853-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivBirth1814-1837, 1863-1914, 1920-1924, 1926, 1928, 1930-1931, 1935, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivBirth1857, 1871-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivBirth1912-1939, 1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivDeath1864-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivDeath1877-1915, 1928-1932, 1935-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivDeath1914-1939, 1941-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivMarriage1827-1828PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivMarriage1870-1915, 1920-1925, 1929-1932, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivMarriage1872, 1877-1878, 1882-1884, 1886-1915, 1917-1920, 1933-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
LwówLvivMarriage1912-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Lwów - ZniesienieLvivBirth1912-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Lwów - ZniesienieLvivDeath1912-1917, 1920, 1923-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Lwów - ZniesienieLvivMarriage1885PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Lwów - ZniesienieLvivMarriage1912-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŁysiecLysetsBirth1920-1931PRADZIAD
ŁysiecLysetsDeath1919-1931PRADZIAD
ŁysiecLysetsMarriage1919-1931PRADZIAD
MariampolMariiampilBirth1922-1931, 1936PRADZIAD
MariampolMariiampilDeath1922-1931, 1936PRADZIAD
MariampolMariiampilMarriage1922-1931, 1936PRADZIAD
MielnicaMielnicaBirth1823-1911, 1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MielnicaMielnicaBirth1912-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MielnicaMielnicaDeath1851-1909PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MielnicaMielnicaDeath1910-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MielnicaMielnicaMarriage1908-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MielnicaMielnicaMarriage1913-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MikołajówMykolaivMarriage1938-1939PRADZIAD
MikulińceMykulyntsiBirth1848-1871, 1873-1898, 1900, 1902-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MikulińceMykulyntsiBirth1857, 1926-1928PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MikulińceMykulyntsiBirth1910-1919, 1922-1925, 1927, 1929-1936PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MikulińceMykulyntsiDeath1877-1884, 1886, 1891-1892, 1895, 1900-1908PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MikulińceMykulyntsiDeath1909-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MikulińceMykulyntsiMarriage1877-1881, 1883-1886, 1888-1889, 1891, 1893-1894, 1901-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MikulińceMykulyntsiMarriage1911-1914, 1917-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MonasterzyskaMonastyryskaBirth1924-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MonasterzyskaMonastyryskaBirth1941-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MonasterzyskaMonastyryskaDeath1918-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MonasterzyskaMonastyryskaMarriage1918-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MościskaMostyskaBirth1882-1909PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MościskaMostyskaMarriage1862-1905PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
MościskaMostyskaMarriage1906-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Mosty WielkieVelyki MostyBirth1861-1874, 1877-1916PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Mosty WielkieVelyki MostyBirth1895-1915, 1917-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Mosty WielkieVelyki MostyDeath1877-1905, 1918PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Mosty WielkieVelyki MostyDeath1906-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Mosty WielkieVelyki MostyMarriage1879-1918, 1920-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Mosty WielkieVelyki MostyMarriage1918PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NadwórnaNadvirnaBirth1843, 1847, 1866-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NadwórnaNadvirnaBirth1912-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NadwórnaNadvirnaDeath1868-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NadwórnaNadvirnaDeath1911-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NadwórnaNadvirnaMarriage1890-1939, 1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NadwórnaNadvirnaMarriage1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NadwórnaNadvirnaMarriage1932PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NarajówNarayivBirth1876-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NarajówNarayivBirth1910-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NarajówNarayivDeath1877-1896PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NarajówNarayivDeath1903-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NarajówNarayivMarriage1877-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NawariaNawarijaBirth1878, 1883-1887, 1889-1895, 1901, 1904-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NawariaNawarijaBirth1914-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NawariaNawarijaDeath1877, 1901, 1909-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NawariaNawarijaDeath1914-1934, 1936-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NawariaNawarijaMarriage1878-1881, 1892-1895, 1899-1903, 1905-1909, 1913-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
NawariaNawarijaMarriage1912-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ObertynObertynBirth1849-1873, 1877-1884, 1891-1908PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ObertynObertynBirth1908-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ObertynObertynDeath1877-1909PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ObertynObertynDeath1909-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ObertynObertynMarriage1861-1865, 1877-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ObertynObertynMarriage1908-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Okopy Św. TrójcyOkopyMarriage1854-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
OleskoOleskoBirth1877-1909, 1925-1927PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
OleskoOleskoBirth1910-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
OleskoOleskoDeath1877-1914, 1916PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
OleskoOleskoDeath1877-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
OleskoOleskoMarriage1859-1875PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
OleskoOleskoMarriage1878-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodhajcePidhaitsiBirth1877, 1879, 1886, 1890-1894, 1898-1899, 1902, 1906-1908PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodhajcePidhaitsiBirth1930-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodhajcePidhaitsiDeath1879-1882, 1884, 1887, 1893-1897, 1900, 1904-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodhajcePidhaitsiDeath1911-1925PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodhajcePidhaitsiMarriage1847, 1858-1861, 1864-1867, 1869-1880, 1882, 1887-1889, 1891-1894, 1898-1901, 1905PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodhajcePidhaitsiMarriage1911-1921PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodkamieńPidkaminBirth1875PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodkamieńPidkaminBirth1900-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodkamieńPidkaminBirth1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodkamieńPidkaminDeath1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodkamieńPidkaminDeath1921-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodkamieńPidkaminMarriage1914-1915, 1920-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodwołoczyskaPidvolochyskBirth1877-1898, 1900-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodwołoczyskaPidvolochyskBirth1898-1899PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodwołoczyskaPidvolochyskBirth1912-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodwołoczyskaPidvolochyskDeath1877-1896PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodwołoczyskaPidvolochyskDeath1920-1922PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodwołoczyskaPidvolochyskMarriage1883-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PodwołoczyskaPidvolochyskMarriage1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PomorzanyPomoryanyBirth1866, 1871, 1874-1876, 1880, 1883, 1889-1890, 1892-1901, 1903-1904, 1906-1912, 1914-1916PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PomorzanyPomoryanyBirth1918-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PomorzanyPomoryanyDeath1919-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
PomorzanyPomoryanyMarriage1923-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ProbużnaProbizhnaBirth1890-1936PRADZIAD
ProbużnaProbizhnaDeath1938PRADZIAD
ProbużnaProbizhnaMarriage Supplement1932PRADZIAD
PrzemyślanyPeremyshlianyBirth1902-1909PRADZIAD
PrzemyślanyPeremyshlianyBirth1924-1942PRADZIAD
PrzemyślanyPeremyshlianyDeath1908-1942PRADZIAD
PrzemyślanyPeremyshlianyMarriage1877-1913PRADZIAD
PrzemyślanyPeremyshlianyMarriage1920-1939PRADZIAD
PrzemyślanyPeremyshlianyMarriage Bann1918-1939PRADZIAD
Rawa RuskaRava-RuskaBirth1816-1912, 1914, 1922-1925PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Rawa RuskaRava-RuskaBirth1909, 1920-1925PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Rawa RuskaRava-RuskaDeath1845-1870, 1877-1900, 1904-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Rawa RuskaRava-RuskaDeath1901-1925PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Rawa RuskaRava-RuskaMarriage1877-1908PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Rawa RuskaRava-RuskaMarriage1909-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RohatynRohatynBirth1859-1881, 1888-1889, 1898-1911, 1914, 1922, 1934, 1938-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RohatynRohatynBirth1912-1922, 1931-1939, 1941-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RohatynRohatynDeath1887-1898, 1914, 1938-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RohatynRohatynDeath1899-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RohatynRohatynMarriage1923, 1925, 1927, 1935, 1938-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RozdółRozdilBirth1869-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RozdółRozdilBirth1906-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RozdółRozdilDeath1877-1898PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RozdółRozdilDeath1899-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RozdółRozdilMarriage1903-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyBirth1828-1850, 1863-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyBirth1910-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyDeath1866-1876, 1878-1882, 1888-1890, 1892, 1896-1906PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyDeath1907-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyDeath1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyMarriage1877-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyMarriage1883-1885, 1896, 1903PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyMarriage1915-1932PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
RudkiRudkyMarriage Bann1915-1932PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Sądowa WiszniaSudova VyshniaBirth1901-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Sądowa WiszniaSudova VyshniaBirth1901-1939, 1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Sądowa WiszniaSudova VyshniaDeath1915-1939, 1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Sądowa WiszniaSudova VyshniaMarriage1915-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SakałaBirth1872-1882, 1886-1892PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SakałaDeath1839-1892PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SamborSambirBirth1862-1883, 1885-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SamborSambirBirth1913-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SamborSambirDeath1868-1883, 1887-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SamborSambirDeath1911-1915, 1920-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SamborSambirMarriage1877-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SamborSambirMarriage1906-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SasówSasivBirth1888-1913, 1921-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SasówSasivBirth1899-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SasówSasivDeath1859-1876, 1879-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SasówSasivDeath1921-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SasówSasivMarriage1879, 1881-1882, 1884, 1897-1898, 1900, 1903, 1905, 1907-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SasówSasivMarriage1884-1912, 1922-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałaSkala-PodilskaBirth1893-1909PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałaSkala-PodilskaBirth1910-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałaSkala-PodilskaDeath1893-1900, 1912-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałaSkala-PodilskaMarriage1882-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałatSkalatBirth1859-1896, 1898-1909PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałatSkalatBirth1910-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałatSkalatDeath1859-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałatSkalatDeath1908-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałatSkalatMarriage1877-1901PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkałatSkalatMarriage1902-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkoleSkoleBirth1878-1880, 1883-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkoleSkoleBirth1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkoleSkoleDeath1877-1882, 1884-1887, 1889-1905, 1907-1911, 1913-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkoleSkoleDeath1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkoleSkoleMarriage1882, 1888-1891, 1893, 1895-1901, 1903, 1906-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SkoleSkoleMarriage1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚniatynSniatynBirth1863, 1869, 1872-1873, 1876, 1878, 1880, 1883-1884, 1887, 1889, 1891, 1893-1895, 1897-1898, 1901-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚniatynSniatynBirth1863-1915, 1918-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚniatynSniatynDeath1917-1928PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚniatynSniatynMarriage1862, 1879-1885, 1887-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚniatynSniatynMarriage1920-1940, 1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚniatynSniatynMarriage Bann1920-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokalSokalBirth1858-1880, 1882-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokalSokalBirth1914-1915, 1917-1919, 1922-1925, 1927-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokalSokalDeath1831-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokalSokalDeath1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokalSokalMarriage1863-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokalSokalMarriage1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokołówkaSokolivkaBirth1877, 1900-1902, 1911-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokołówkaSokolivkaBirth1912, 1920-1927PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokołówkaSokolivkaDeath1877-1900, 1906PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokołówkaSokolivkaDeath1877-1916, 1921-1931PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokołówkaSokolivkaMarriage1877-1916, 1922-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SokołówkaSokolivkaMarriage1905-1906, 1910, 1912-1913, 1921-1932PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SołotwinaSolotvynBirth1916-1931PRADZIAD
SołotwinaSolotvynDeath1916-1931PRADZIAD
SołotwinaSolotvynMarriage1919-1931PRADZIAD
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskBirth1864-1874, 1877-1914, 1937-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskBirth1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskBirth1928-1932PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskDeath1863-1887, 1890-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskDeath1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskDeath1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskMarriage1872-1876, 1897-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StanisławówIvano-FrankivskMarriage1913-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stara SólStara SilBirth1892-1903PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stare MiastoStaryy SamborBirth1856-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stare MiastoStaryy SamborBirth1898-1903PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stare MiastoStaryy SamborDeath1877-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stare MiastoStaryy SamborMarriage1856-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stare MiastoStaryy SamborMarriage1877-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stary SamborStaryy SamborBirth1910-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stary SamborStaryy SamborDeath1908-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Stary SamborStaryy SamborMarriage1908-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StojanówStoyanivMarriage1901-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StojanówStoyanivMarriage1931-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StratynStratinBirth1859-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StratynStratinDeath1859-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StrusówStrusovBirth1890-1898PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StrusówStrusovBirth1898-1933PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StrusówStrusovDeath1871-1900PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StrusówStrusovDeath1901-1933PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StrusówStrusovMarriage1871-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StrusówStrusovMarriage1877-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StrusówStrusovMarriage Bann1898-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyBirth1858-1871, 1886, 1890-1891, 1894-1895, 1904PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyBirth1870-1872, 1875-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyBirth1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyDeath1869-1914, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyDeath1889, 1920-1921, 1924PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyDeath1914-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyMarriage1877-1883, 1885-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyMarriage1899, 1892PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
StryjStryyMarriage1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Strzeliska NoweNovi StrilyshchaBirth1877-1879, 1890, 1891-1894, 1899-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Strzeliska NoweNovi StrilyshchaBirth1910-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Strzeliska NoweNovi StrilyshchaDeath1877-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Strzeliska NoweNovi StrilyshchaDeath1911-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Strzeliska NoweNovi StrilyshchaMarriage1894-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚwirzSvirzhBirth1895-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚwirzSvirzhDeath1877-1897PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚwirzSvirzhDeath1897-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŚwirzSvirzhMarriage1878-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SzczerzecShchyretsBirth1875, 1878, 1880-1882, 1885, 1888-1889, 1893-1899, 1901, 1903-1904, 1906-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SzczerzecShchyretsBirth1913-1915, 1917-1925, 1927-1930PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SzczerzecShchyretsDeath1878, 1881-1882, 1884, 1886, 1889, 1896-1897, 1900-1903, 1905-1911, 1914-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SzczerzecShchyretsDeath1912-1926, 1928, 1930-1932, 1934-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
SzczerzecShchyretsMarriage1877-1883, 1885-1890, 1893-1898, 1900, 1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TarnopolTernopilBirth1861-1899, 1903-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TarnopolTernopilBirth1914-1941PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TarnopolTernopilDeath1870-1876, 1878-1892, 1894-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TarnopolTernopilDeath1914-1918, 1920-1928, 1931-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TarnopolTernopilMarriage1878-1914, 1937-1943PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TarnopolTernopilMarriage1912-1914, 1917-1931, 1933, 1936-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TartakówTartakivBirth1858-1913, 1918, 1921, 1922, 1932, 1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TartakówTartakivBirth1912-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TartakówTartakivDeath1877-1906, 1908-1910, 1912, 1914-1915, 1933-1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TartakówTartakivDeath1912, 1914-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TartakówTartakivMarriage1845-1875, 1877-1915, 1917-1921, 1931-1932, 1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TartakówTartakivMarriage1912-1915, 1917-1930, 1932-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TorczynTorchinDivorce1857PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TousteTovsteBirth1868-1920, 1922-1939PRADZIAD
TousteTovsteDeath1924-1934PRADZIAD
TousteTovsteMarriage1890-1939PRADZIAD
TrembowlaTerebovlyaBirth1877-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TrembowlaTerebovlyaBirth1914-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TrembowlaTerebovlyaDeath1912, 1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TrembowlaTerebovlyaDeath1912-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TrembowlaTerebovlyaMarriage1877-1914, 1917-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TurkaTurkaBirth1914-1922, 1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TurkaTurkaBirth1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TurkaTurkaDeath1915-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
TurkaTurkaMarriage1916-1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UchnówUhnivBirth1889 - 1895PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UhnówUhnivBirth1877-1889, 1896-1898, 1903-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UhnówUhnivDeath1853-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UhnówUhnivDeath1877-1925PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UhnówUhnivMarriage1871-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UhnówUhnivMarriage1882-1931PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UłaszkowceUlashkivtsiBirth1875, 1884-1885, 1889-1890, 1892, 1895PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UłaszkowceUlashkivtsiDeath1874, 1884, 1886, 1889-1890, 1896, 1898-1900PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
UłaszkowiceBirth1891PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
Uście BiskupieUstyeDeath1831-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
WinnikiVynnykyBirth1898-1901, 1904, 1907-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
WinnikiVynnykyBirth1914-1921, 1931-1932, 1934-1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
WinnikiVynnykyDeath1881, 1883, 1886, 1892-1893, 1895, 1897-1899, 1902-1903, 1908-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
WinnikiVynnykyDeath1914, 1916-1928, 1931-1936, 1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
WinnikiVynnykyMarriage1883, 1885-1890, 1895-1896, 1898-1901, 1904-1908, 1910-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
WinnikiVynnykyMarriage1914-1926, 1928-1929, 1933-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻabieVerkhovynaBirth1877-1907PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻabieVerkhovynaBirth1908-1927PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻabieVerkhovynaDeath1884-1918PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻabieVerkhovynaMarriage1891-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻabieVerkhovynaMarriage1915-1936PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZabłotówZabolotivBirth1861-1876, 1879-1882, 1888-1892, 1908-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZabłotówZabolotivDeath1884-1906PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZabłotówZabolotivDeath1907-1919PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZabłotówZabolotivMarriage1896-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZabłotówZabolotivMarriage1913-1931PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZałoźceZaliztsiBirth1877-1890PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZałoźceZaliztsiBirth1902-1923, 1925-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZałoźceZaliztsiDeath1823-1861, 1877-1897, 1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZałoźceZaliztsiDeath1915-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZałoźceZaliztsiMarriage1853-1876, 1877-1938, 1925-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZałoźceZaliztsiMarriage Bann1922-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZawałówZavalivBirth1870-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZawałówZavalivBirth1900-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZbarażZbarazhBirth1869, 1873, 1875, 1877-1889, 1890, 1891-1912PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZbarażZbarazhBirth1913-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZbarażZbarazhDeath1859-1893, 1908-1911PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZbarażZbarazhMarriage1859-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZbarażZbarazhMarriage1911-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivBirth1819-1882PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivBirth1877-1890PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivBirth1910-1925, 1936-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivDeath1877-1905PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivDeath1911-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivMarriage1907-1935PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivMarriage1921-1931PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZborówZborivMarriage Bann1880-1919PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZłoczówZolochivBirth1865-1871, 1876, 1891-1908, 1910-1913PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZłoczówZolochivBirth1914-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZłoczówZolochivDeath1855-1875, 1877-1896, 1898-1914PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZłoczówZolochivDeath1912-1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZłoczówZolochivMarriage1877-1912, 1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ZłoczówZolochivMarriage1898-1912, 1916-1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻółkiewZhovkvaBirth1853-1899, 1903-1907, 1909-1910PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻółkiewZhovkvaBirth1912-1930, 1932, 1934-1940PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻółkiewZhovkvaDeath1870-1915PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻółkiewZhovkvaDeath1912-1932, 1936-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻółkiewZhovkvaMarriage1815-1873, 1877-1880, 1888-1915, 1927, 1937PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻółkiewZhovkvaMarriage1899PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻółkiewZhovkvaMarriage1912-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻurawnoZhuravneBirth1877-1885PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻurawnoZhuravneDeath1877-1900PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻurówZhurivMarriage1867-1876PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻydaczówZhydachivBirth1877-1885, 1887-1910, 1912, 1928-1929, 1931-1933PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻydaczówZhydachivBirth1890-1898, 1901, 1904-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻydaczówZhydachivDeath1877-1883, 1887-1888, 1890-1895, 1897-1900, 1903, 1905-1906, 1908-1913, 1828-1933, 1935, 1938PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻydaczówZhydachivDeath1919-1942PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻydaczówZhydachivMarriage1878, 1881, 1888-1891, 1899-1901, 1907-1909, 1913, 1928-1934PRADZIAD JRI-Poland
ŻydaczówZhydachivMarriage1915-1939PRADZIAD JRI-Poland

About those 10,000 Polish resources

When you enter the B&F Compendium of Jewish Genealogy, you are presented with a list of 207 countries. Among them, I’ve seeded those countries and their provinces with over 1,200 resources. Collecting those resources was time-consuming to say the least. At some point I decided, however, to go a step further and look into adding resources at the city level. I knew I couldn’t add resources for every city, town and village in the world, but I thought maybe I could do so for one country. I decided on Poland because I knew there were a number of unique city-level resources available. In general, I didn’t add one resource at a time, but rather hundreds at a time. Otherwise there would be no way to get to the 10,000 resources I added. I wanted to take a look at some of the sources I tapped in putting together the collection on this site.

One detail – I’m not making a distinction between cities, towns and villages – for the most part I use those terms interchangeable. Certainly most of the ‘cities’ for Poland are not more than towns, and in many cases tiny villages.

One of the hardest things in putting together the city-level resources for Poland was making sure all the records matched the correct cities. When trying to connect resources from many different sources, it was sometimes hard to make sure that the towns referenced were the same ones. Many towns in Poland use the same, or very similar names. At first, I thought I could use the Province/County information to identify each town, before I realized there was no place that had a good reference of all of them. JewishGen and Virtual Shtetl had the data for the pre-WWI period and/or the interwar period, but not the modern period. I felt it was important to anchor everything based on the modern province/county information, just as I felt it was important to only collect information on towns currently in Poland. There has to be a frame of reference for collecting all this information, and I wanted it to be the current country/province/county data. After I put together a list of towns I intended on collecting information on, I then did something a bit crazy. I found the Wikipedia pages for every town, in both the English and Polish versions. By finding the Wikipedia pages, I was able to add not only the Province (Voivodeship) and County (Powiat) to my database, but the latitude/longitude coordinates as well. Armed with the administrative divisions and the map coordinates, I had enough information to, in almost every case, match up the records I collected to the correct towns.

The top of the city record for Kańczuga, Poland
The top of the city topic for Kańczuga, Poland

The Wikipedia entries, in addition to the official government sites for those towns, were added to a new section unique to cities, called General. Unlike almost all resources in the compendium, records in the General section are not specifically Jewish. Rather, they are intended as a kind of anchor point for the rest of the records, to insure we’re talking about the correct town. If you find a resource in the rest of the town section that doesn’t seem to match the town in the General section, then let me know. There are bound to be some mistakes. The General records are there, therefore, to help correct those mistakes.

One thing to note about the official town web sites. In addition to Poland having a province (voivodeship) and a county (powiat), there is also a third smaller district called a Gmina in Polish, sometimes translated as a Municipality or a Commune. In some cases the city itself doesn’t have a web site, rather the city web site is part of the Gmina web site. In cases where the Gmina has the same name as the town (very common), and no specific town site could be found, I linked to the Gmina web site. I did something similar with the Coat of Arms for towns in Poland. When I couldn’t find one for the town, if the town was in a Gmina of the same name, I used the Coat of Arms of the Gmina.

JewishGen provided four major groups of resources to Polish cities – the Community Database, the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF), the Yikzor Book Project, and KehilaLinks. The other major resource groups included links from Virtual Shtetl, the IAJGS Jewish Cemetery Project, JRI-Poland, the Routes to Roots Foundation, Gesher Galicia, Geni, and two large Polish sites documenting Jewish cemeteries in Poland – Kirkuty.xip.pl and Złe miejsca dla ślimaków.

In addition to these major groups, each of which contributed hundreds of resources, there were hundreds of other individual resources collected from a variety of sites including landsmanshaft sites, individual cemetery sites, contemporary Jewish community sites, etc. While I tried not to stray off-course too much in collecting these individual records (I hoped rather that these kinds of records would be contributed by users after launch) I found it hard not to add uniques sites that I found.

Let’s a take a look at the major resource groups to help those who are unfamiliar with some or all of them (in alphabetical order):

Geni – While perhaps better known for their World Family Tree trying to connect everyone on the planet, Geni also offers user-created research projects. These projects can cover anything, but many of them cover specific communities that people want to research. Many research projects have been set up to research former Jewish communities, and those projects are what I’ve linked to in the compendium.

Gesher Galicia – Galicia was a region of the former Austrian Empire, which is now split between Poland and Ukraine. Gesher Galicia is a very active group researching Jewish families from that region, and collecting original records from archives in Poland and Ukraine and making them available in its All Galicia Database. Their town listing is automatically generated from information on each town including the pre-war administrative districts and map coordinates, and lists how many Gesher Galicia members have indicated they are researching each town (in their Gesher Galicia Family Finder).

IAJGS Jewish Cemetery Project – Often overlooked, the IAJGS Jewish Cemetery Project is a massive database trying to list every known Jewish cemetery on the planet. There is a huge amount of information contained in the database, although nothing about specific burials (that’s left to the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry, although there’s no way to link to information in JOWBR for a specific town). If you want to find out if a cemetery exists in your ancestral town and what condition it’s in, this is a good place to start.

JewishGen Communities Database – This is a database of towns worldwide with confirmed Jewish communities. Unlike the much larger JewishGen Gazetteer which has over a million localities in over 54 countries based on the U.S. Board on Geographic Names database, the JewishGen Communities Database is a curated list of roughly 6,000 towns where there is known to be, or have been, a Jewish community. For each town, the database links to other resources on JewishGen, as well as selected resources on other sites. The town pages have other very useful information, such as a list of the closest towns in the database to the current town, as well as alternate names for the town in different languages.

JewishGen Family Finder – The JewishGen Family Finder, or JGFF, is a significant resource for potentially finding other relatives. The idea is simple, you add a list of town/surname pairs to the database. If someone else is researching the same surname from the same town, then they will find you when searching the database, and hopefully contact you. I wrote about how to get started with the JGFF on the JewishGen blog back in 2011 (JewishGen Basics: The JewishGen Family Finder) and I recommend reading that post as an introduction if you haven’t used JGFF before.

JewishGen KehilaLinks – Originally known as ShetLinks (as in links to Shtetls), the KehilaLinks project is, for the most part, a attempt to create pages memorializing former Jewish communities. In some ways you can think of KehilaLink sites as modern version of Yizkor Books. The difference, perhaps, is that while Yizkor Books were published by former residents of their communities, at this point KehilaLink sites are being produced primarily by descendants of the residents of these communities. The amount of information available for each town varies wildly, as they are solely edited by volunteers for each town. If you have additional information to contriubte for your ancestral town, I recommend contacting the coordinator for your town and sending them your information to be added.

JewishGen Yizkor Book Project – An amazing project that seeks to collect information on all Yizkor Books published, extract lists of the dead (necrology lists) from them, and translate them. Yizkor Books were for the most part memorial books published by the survivors of communities destroyed during the Holocaust. These books were published in the decades following the Holocaust, frequently in Yiddish or Hebrew, mainly in the US and Israel where landsmanshaftn for these communities existed. Many of these books contain lists of those who were murdered during the Holocaust, memories about what it was like to live in the communities, photographs of people, etc. They are incredible resource that many people have not been able to leverage in their research due to their scarcity (they were privately published in small quantities for members of the community) and the language barrier, but this project is looking to make these books more readily available online, and to offer translations of some or all of each book online.

JRI-Poland – Formally Jewish Records Indexing – Poland, JRI-Poland is a decades-long effort spearheaded by Stanley Diamond to index and publish Jewish vital records from Poland (and places that were formerly part of Poland). Working with local archives in Poland and elsewhere, JRI-Poland has managed to index over 5 million records from over 550 towns. While the index can provide most of the information in a record, the records on JRI-Poland also give you the information you need to order copies of the records from the local archives. More recently as many of these records have gone online, JRI-Poland has linked directly to the digital copies of the records on Polish archive web sites. JRI-Poland’s town pages generally includes the map coordinates for the town, and sometimes the province. Links to off-site resources can include links to the JewishGen Communities Database and Virtual Shtetl. In addition to that basic information, the town page shows you what records exist in the local archives as well as in LDS microfilms (which sometimes overlap), and gives you information on fundraising for the various indexing projects for that town. To see what is actually indexed, however, you must search in their database.

Kirkuty.xip.pl – A kind of memorial to the pre-war Jewish community of Poland, this web site documents the current state of Jewish cemeteries across Poland. The site is, for the most part, only in Polish. Information is given on the history of the Jewish community in the town, and there are usually photographs of the current state of the cemetery and sometimes links to other related web sites.

Routes to Roots Foundation – The culmination of decades of research by Miriam Weiner, the Routes to Roots database contains information on what vital records and other documents covering Jewish communities exist in archives in Belarus, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Ukraine, and to a lesser extent Latvia, Romania and Russia. Originally published in two books written my Miriam Weiner (Jewish Roots in Poland, and Jewish Roots in Ukraine and Moldova), the information is kept up to date on the web site, and has been expanded over the years to include new records that have been found. When looking to see if any records exist for your ancestral town, this database is a good place to start. It’s worth mentioning that I link to the search results for the town, which might include records from other towns with matching names, so don’t automatically assume that records in these search results are from your town.

Virtual Shtetl – A project of the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Virtual Shtetl is a large database of information of current and mostly former Jewish communities in Poland. The database of communities consists of 1971 towns, all either currently in, or formerly in, Poland. Basic information like the pre-WWII province/county and the map coordinates are provided for each community, as well as links to some other sites such as the JewishGen Community Database and JRI-Poland. While each town has different information, information can include information on the Jewish community, cemeteries, synagogues, people, landsmanshaftn, heritage cites, sites where Jews were murdered, etc. Most of the information is in Polish, although some has been translated into English. If you look on the English version of the site it will show you whether is in English, and when it comes to a resource with no translation it will show it to you in Polish.

Złe miejsca dla ślimaków – Roughly translated as ‘Bad place for snails’ this blog documents places near the author’s home in Pulawy, Poland. ‘Near’ seems to be a relative term, as the author has documented hundreds of towns. These places include cemeteries (both Jewish and non-Jewish) and buildings such as former synagogues and yeshivas. The site is completely in Polish, but provides information on the places it documents, and includes photos of each place. When documenting a cemetery, the resource shows up in the Cemeteries section. When documenting a building that was once a synagogue or yeshiva, I’ve placed the resource in the Contemporary section. That may be counterintuitive, but if the Synagogue is currently being used as a bar, then that is the contemporary representation of the former Jewish community in that town. I don’t think there are any examples of a town where there is a contemporary Jewish community and the former synagogue is being used for something not connected to the Jewish community, so it shouldn’t be too confusing.

Some examples of individual sites that I added include The World Society of Częstochowa Jews and their Descendants (see Częstochowa in the compendium), the Chelmer Organization in Israel (see Chełm in the compendium), and the Jewish Tarnow Facebook group (see Tarnów in the compendium).

If you represent another site that has a large number of town-specific information, contact me directly and I can share a spreadsheet that can be filled out to allow records to be added easily to the site. Even if you don’t represent a site, but if you think another existing site is worth adding and are willing to collect the information needed, be in touch. If you’re a site looking to utilize some of the information on this site, such as the province/county data I’ve collected, please also be in touch. My goal is to expand access to this information, and if that means helping other sites to improve, I’m more than happy to help them.

I hope people found this information useful, and that you will share this with your friends (perhaps on Facebook or Twitter?) who may not yet know about the availability of these resources. Let me know what you think in the comments below.

A Major Breakthough for Jewish Polish Records

JRI-Poland and the Polish State Archives have announced a new agreement to expand the availability of Jewish records from Poland. An earlier agreement which was in effect between 1997 and 2006 resulted in the indexing of more than 4 million records which make up the bulk of the JRI-Poland database. The cancellation of that agreement in 2006 was a major blow to Jewish genealogy. There have been ongoing discussions since 2007, but the resumption of cooperation did not materialize until now. This announcement, made on Friday, is much more than most expected, and well worth the wait.

The first major component of the announcement is that JRI-Poland will be able to add an additional million records to its database within the next year. That is in addition to the 4 million existing records already in their database that originate from the Polish State Archives.

JRI-Poland Executive Director Stanley Diamond signing the agreement in the
presence of Polish Consul General Andrzej Szydło in Montreal, Quebec.

The second major component is that JRI-Poland will launch a new Order Processing System, which will allow people searching for records on the site to click on a record they want and order it directly on the JRI-Poland site using a credit card. JRI-Poland will handle the credit card processing and the archives in Poland will copy the records. For anyone who has dealt with ordering records from Polish archives directly, this is a major breakthrough.

While my Finding and getting copies of Jewish records in Poland article is still one of the most popular on this site, and was published in print as well, it is my hope that this announcement means that in the future that article will not be needed.

Polish State Archives General Director Władysław Stępniak signing the agreement,
with JRI-Poland representative 
Krzysztof Malczewski (on left) looking on.

The third major component of the announcement is that the Polish State Archives is starting a major effort to digitize all of their records in all 30 Regional Archives, and make them available for free online. As these digital scans come online, JRI-Poland will link directly to the images from their database search results. As the images come online, the new Order Processing System will be phased out.

The announcement is available on the JRI-Poland site (in English) as well as the Polish State Archives site (in Polish).

I’d like to congratulate Stanley Diamond, the Co-Founder and Executive Director of JRI-Poland, as well as the other JRI-Poland board members, staff and volunteers who made this agreement possible.

I look forward to seeing the different elements of this agreement come to fruition, and will let readers of this blog know about things as they happen.

Finding and getting copies of Jewish records in Poland

Many Jewish researchers will find that some members of their family originated in what is now, or once was, Poland. This post is targeted at Jewish researchers, but anyone who has roots in Poland may find (at least parts of) this information useful. 

Poland’s Borders

Poland’s borders have changed a lot over the years, and what was once Poland might now be in Lithuania, Ukraine or Belarus. In addition, what was once part of Russia, Prussia (part of what became Germany) and Austria may now be in Poland. It’s possible that someone lives in many countries without actually ever moving. The following map illustrates the complexity of figuring out what country a relative of your might have lived in:

A History of Polish Borders (from staypoland.com)

I have many examples in my own family where relatives had said they were from Russia, when the town they came from is currently in Poland. This is a particularly important point when you find records on your family in the US, such as a passenger manifest from their arrival to the US, or naturalization papers, when they say they were born in Russia. Don’t assume that means the current country is in Russia, unless you know the city and can confirm that on a map.

I’m not going to go into how to find where your family comes from in this post (that will in future posts), but rather once you know where and when your relative was born (and that place is or was in Poland) how to find vital records connected to that relative.

Starting with JRI-Poland

So let’s begin. You know the name of your relative, and where he was born and when he was born. If you don’t know the exact date, that’s okay, we’ll deal with that a little later in the post. The first place to start your search is JRI-Poland. JRI-Poland is a database of indexes to Jewish records in what is now or once was Poland. The indexes come from a number of sources, but there are two primary sources: JRI-Poland’s own JRI-Poland/Polish State Archives Project and LDS Microfilms.

Basically, the LDS church microfilmed over 2 million Jewish records, including from some towns whose records were destroyed in WWII. Even with so many records, however, the LDS films do not cover the majority of records in Poland. Those records and their indexes are preserved on microfilm and accessible in the Family History Library, or from the many Family History Centers around the globe. Of course, the records may be in Polish, Russian or German depending when and where they were created, so it is not so easy to access those records without knowledge of the relevant language.

Initially JRI-Poland worked to index records not in the LDS microfilms, since so many were not even available on those films. They created a joint project with the Polish State Archives where they photocopied the index pages for each archive and then hired local workers in Poland to transcribe each record from whatever language they were in to English (or rather, to latin script). JRI-Poland carried this out by arranging for people to figure out all the towns with records of Jewish people in a particular archive, then raising money from researchers interested in each town. Thus researchers would contribute money to the indexing efforts of the town from where their own family came. As JRI-Poland indexed millions of records this way, they eventually turned back to the LDS microfilms and worked to create computerized indexes in English to those records as well. JRI-Poland has indexed more than four million records so far, from over 500 towns.

To use JRI-Poland, you go to their main page and select Search Database. This takes you to their search page which has a lot of options. I’m not going to go into all the options for searching JRI-Poland in this post, but you should check out some of the neat features like searching in a radius around a specific latitude and longitude, which is helpful if you can’t find records of your relatives in the town you think they came from, and want to check surrounding towns. The core of the search interface is really this:

JRI-Poland Search

You can choose which parameters you want to search, but usually this will be Surname and Town. You can, if your surname is rare, try searching with just the Surname to try to figure out the town, but as I mentioned for the purposes of this post I’m assuming you know that already.

In the above example I’ve used the surname Eisenman and the town Tyszowce. Note that for the Surname I’ve used ‘Sounds Like’ as the setting and for Town I’ve used ‘is Exactly’. The reason for using ‘Sounds Like’ for the surname is that it is very common for there to be multiple spellings for names, even for the same family in the same town. Records from one town were not necessarily all transcribed by the same person, so even the same name in Polish might show up spelled differently depending who was transcribing it. The reason for using ‘is Exactly’ for the town name is that each town has an exact spelling, which corresponds to the currently used spelling for the town. As you do your research into towns, you should always use the current spelling of the town, and in this case you should figure it out before searching so you don’t get listings from many similarly sounding towns which are irrelevant to your search.

Different Kinds of Results

If you were to carry out the above search, you would find two sets of results. This means that the indexes came from two different sources. In some cases you might find many sets of results, since some indexes show the town of birth of people who show up in other towns. For example, if your relative was born in town A and married in town B, and you searched for town A you might also find his marriage record in town B (if they indexed the birth town) which would show up a separate result set. The two result sets from the above search start out as follows:

First result set – indexed from microfilmed records (click to see larger)
Second result set – indexed from photocopies from archives (click to see larger)

As you can see in the captions, one set is from a microfilmed index, and one is from index pages copied from the actual archive in Poland. How do I know this?

Take a look at the first image – the last column is called ‘Film’ and the number listed is the LDS microfilm number. If you were to search the LDS library on FamilySearch.org, you would find that there are actually seven microfilms that cost the vital records of Tyszowce from 1826-1890. The first record is from microfilm 766305 and the result shown in the snapshot above are from 766306. Also note that the first two records are children of the same parents, but their last names are spelled differently (and both different than the way I spelled it in the search). This is why you need to use the ‘Sounds Like’ setting for names on the search.

In the second image, you’ll notice there is no ‘Film’ column. In addition if you look closely in the result set description at the top, there is an extra line compared to the first set, where it says ‘records in Fond 785 in Zamosc Archive’. Note that these records are in the archive of Zamosc, a nearby town, and not in Tyszowce itself. 

Ordering Records from Microfilm

So you now have two types of records, ones on microfilm and ones only available directly from the archive. Let’s see how you can get these records. Let’s start with the microfilmed record. Let’s say you want the first record listed. You need to extract the following information on the record:

Surname: Eyzenman
Given Name: Mejlech
Town: Tyszowce
Year: 1840
Type: B (Birth)
Akt: 36
Film: 766305

With the above information anyone with access to LDS microfilms should be able to find the specific record you want. The Family History Library and its associated Centers will not send you copies of records from their microfilm, someone has to actually access the microfilms and copy them. There are a number of ways to get copies, some easier than others, some more or less expensive.

First, you can go to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, or one of the Family History Centers and try to get the record yourself. Keep in mind that if you’re going to one of the regional Centers, you will probably need to order the microfilm in advance, and then return to use the microfilm. If you are interested in copying a large number of records this might make sense, although remember that the records are in Polish, Russian or German and if you’re not familiar with the necessary languages it might be difficult to find the records even if you know where to look. If the number of records you want are small, it will almost never be worth going to the do the record retrieval yourself.

Next, you can have someone else go to the Family History Library for you. For other types of records, particularly those in the US, you can sometimes find volunteers to look up records for you. Examples of places to find such volunteers include Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness and photo volunteers on Find A Grave. In this case, however, I think you will need to find either a friend or a professional researcher to help you. There are many professional researchers who live in or around Salt Lake City and who will go to the Family History Library for you and retrieve records for you. Keep in mind that not all researchers will be familiar with records from Poland, so you’re better off finding someone who has experience working with Jewish records from Poland. One researcher you can try is Banai Feldstein, from Feldstein Genealogical Services in Salt Lake City. She can retrieve records and e-mail you scans of the copies, and you can pay her via PayPal which is a nice plus. For other researchers that specialize in Jewish records, check out the Researchers Directory on the Jewish Genealogy News web site.

Lastly, there is another option, but only in some cases. Beit Hatfutsot (formerly the Diaspora Museum, and now called the Museum of the Jewish People) in Tel Aviv has a collection of LDS microfilms that cover a good portion, but not all, of the Jewish records in LDS microfilms. You can see the full list of the films they have by browsing the database here. If they have the microfilm, they can make a copy of a record and mail it to you. Their rates are very reasonable, only 5nis in Israel and $2 in the US for copied records, including VAT in Israel and mailing with a per-order charge of 10nis (I guess $4 in the US?). While cheaper than using a professional researcher, you need to wait several weeks and you need to receive the records in the mail, since they do not scan and e-mail records. If you were to browse the database for Tyszowce (the town in my example above) you would see they have five films from Tyszowce, not the full seven listed above. That means that if you find records from one of films not listed in the museum’s collection, then you will need to go with one of the above methods. In the first record listed above, which I transcribed the details to, the film number is listed as 766305. If you look at the list on the museum’s website they do indeed have that film.

So how do you order from the museum? You go to their order page, where you will fill out your contact information, microfilm record list and payment information. Let’s look at the microfilm record section of the order page:

Ordering a microfilmed record from the Beit Hatfutsot in Tel Aviv, Israel

Note the list of items I extracted from the record above, and you’ll see they match this form exactly. When you enter the microfilm number in the first field it will very smartly verify that they have that film in their collection – it thus will not let you order a record they do not have. That’s why in the snapshot above the word Microfilm is in red, because it will not let you order a record for a film that does not exist in their collection, and since I didn’t enter a number above, the field doesn’t match anything in their collection. If I had entered the number, the Microfilm field title would switch from red to black to show it was found. If you filled in the form with the record above, it would look like:

Filled out record information in the Beit Hatfutsot order page

If you want to order more than one record, then you just click on the ‘Add Another Microfilm’ button at the bottom and another set of fields will pop up for you to fill in.

So once you fill in your contact info, add the records you want, and add your payment, you just click the Send button at the bottom of the page and then wait a few weeks for the records to arrive.

Ordering Records from Archives

You might remember that there was a second search result, of records in the Zamosc archives. Let’s extract the data from the first result:

Surname: Ajzenman
Given Name: Ezra
Town: Tyszowce
Year: 1893
Type: D (Death)
Fond: 785
Akt: 33

You’ll notice I’ve added in the Fond number from the collection title. The Fond is the collection of records that this record is contained in, and the Akt number is location of the actual record within the Fond.

The first thing you need to do to get this record is to find the Zamosc Archive, where it is listed as being located. JRI-Poland keeps a list of archives that you can refer to to find the archive. Oddly they only list the mailing address and e-mail address, and not the web site for each archive, but the e-mail address should be enough. You can try searching online for the full name of the archive (in this case ‘Archiwum Państwowe w Zamościu’ and seeing if they have a web site (which in most cases they will). In this case the web site shows up as http://www.archiwum.zam.pl/ and if you go to the site you’ll find they have a little British flag in the corner that takes you to an English version of their site. The fact that there is an English web site is a good sign, as many archives do not bother. The web site will tell you more about the records available, and might tell you the pricing for ordering records. In this case the site is not very complete, so it isn’t that useful, but if you browse through the Polish version of the site, you’ll find at least one useful piece of information: the archive’s bank details. Most archives will require you to transfer money directly into their bank accounts in order to fulfill your order. This is annoying to be sure, but there’s not much you can do about it. In my own case, I’ve sometimes had to pay a larger bank transfer fee than the fees the archive was charging me – certainly something which is frustrating.

So you want to contact the archive. You have their e-mail address. What do you write? Well, first you need to decide if you want to try English, or jump ahead to Polish. Many archives do not have English speakers, so you might not really have a choice. If you send an e-mail in English and get no response, you should try Polish.

Sending a Letter in Polish

How do you send an e-mail in Polish? I suggest trying Google Translate. It’s not perfect, but you can check its accuracy in a fairly simple way. I start by writing in English and having it translate to Polish. Then I copy the Polish text and switch the translation direction (click on the little two-way arrow button between the language names) and paste in the Polish text. If the text comes back with more-or-less the same meaning as what I originally wrote, I assume the translation will be understandable to the person receiving the letter. You can always include both the English and the Polish text in your letter if you want.

Let’s start with a simple framework:

Dear Sir,

I am interested in getting scanned copies of the following records:

Please inform me how much it will cost to order these records and how I can pay for them.

Thank you,

That gets translated to:

Szanowny Panie,

Jestem zainteresowany w uzyskaniu zeskanowane kopie następujących zapisów:

Proszę o poinformowanie mnie, ile będzie kosztowało aby te dane i jak mogę zapłacić.

Dziękuję,

If you reverse the translation direction and copy the Polish text back into the translation field, it gives you following text in English:

Dear Sir,

I am interested in obtaining a scanned copy of the following entries:

Please inform me how much will it cost to these data, and how I pay.

Thank you,

Not bad. Probably the text is close enough.

[Tom in the comments below (March 2013) supplied a corrected Polish translation for the above text as:

Szanowny Panie,

Jestem zainteresowany uzyskaniem skanów następujących aktów metrykalnych:


Proszę poinformować mnie, ile będzie kosztować skanowanie tych dokumentów i jak mogę zapłacić.


Dziękuję,

So if you’re going to use the text, you should probably use his.]

Now you need to fill in the information on your record, translating the field names like Surname, Given name, etc.

Using Google Translate, I get the following translations for the field names:

Surname: Ajzenman
Given Name: Ezra
Town: Tyszowce
Year: 1893
Type: D (Death)
Fond: 785
Akt: 33
Nazwisko: Ajzenman
Imię: Ezra
Miasto: Tyszowce
Rok: 1893
Typ: D (Death)
Fond: 785
Akt: 33

Now, considering this is so important to get right I would check this (and of course you can just copy this from this posting, but I’ll explain what I do to check for accuracy. FamilySearch has a number of language resources available on their site, including one for Poland called Poland Genealogical Word List. If you check that word list, you’ll find that indeed the translation is pretty good. The only mistake, but one that would probably be understood, was to translate ‘Town’ into what the wordlist says is actually ‘City’. I doubt the archive would fail to understand what you meant. According to the wordlist, however, the correct term would be Gmina. Also, you may have noticed that it did not translate the word ‘Death’ for some reason. There are several words listed for death in the FamilySearch site, but let’s go with zejść. So your full letter would look like:

Szanowny Panie,

Jestem zainteresowany w uzyskaniu zeskanowane kopie następujących zapisów:

Nazwisko: Ajzenman
Imię: Ezra
Gmina: Tyszowce
Rok: 1893
Typ: D (zejść)
Fond: 785
Akt: 33

Proszę o poinformowanie mnie, ile będzie kosztowało aby te dane i jak mogę zapłacić.

Dziękuję,

Of course, sign the letter at the bottom as well. Now send this letter in an e-mail to the archive’s e-mail address and wait for a response. In response to a similar e-mail which I actually sent in English, I got the following response the next day in Polish:

Opłata za poszukiwania wynosi 25 zł. Opłata nie jest zwracana w przypadku kwerendy negatywnej.

W przypadku odnalezienia aktów powiadomimy o ich liczbie i dodatkowej opłacie 5 zł od skanu.
konto
Archiwum Państwowe w Zamościu
Narodowy Bank Polski Oddział Okręgowy w Lublinie

47 101013390016612231000000

PL 47 101013390016612231000000 (BIC: NBP LP LPW)

Google Translate renders that in English as:

Search fee is 25 zł. The fee is not refunded in the event of a query in the negative.

If you find an update on the acts of their number and to an additional charge of 5 zł scan.
Account
State Archives in Zamosc
Polish National Bank Branch in Lublin District

47 101013390016612231000000

PL 47 101013390016612231000000 (BIC: NBP LP LPW)

It’s not perfect, but it’s understandable. The cost of searching is 25zl and scans are 5zl each. It then lists the archive’s bank details (which are the same as the page we found earlier). Now you can send 25zl and then 5zl later, but frankly the cost of sending money internationally is expensive, so I would suggest just sending it all at once. 30 zloty is about $11 (US).

Sending Money to Banks in Poland

How do you send money to the bank in Poland? It’s not so easy. It would be nice if the archives would start using PayPal or something similar, but I haven’t found one yet that does, so you need to figure out how to get money into their accounts.

You can always give the bank account information to someone in your bank and ask them to transfer the money. Many banks actually let you set up an international money transfer online. I’ve done this from the web interface to my account at Bank of America. It’s pretty easy, but it’s not cheap at $35 per transfer. That’s a lot more than the 30zl fee you’re sending the archives.

Another option is an online money transfer company. I’m not going to recommend any of them since far be it from me to recommend someone who will be handling your money, but one such company I found is Xoom.com. They let you send money to accounts overseas for only $5 per transfer ($10 if you want to pay with a credit card instead of withdrawing the money from your bank account) but you need to send a minimum of $25. Thus if you were ordering that one record you’d be sending $25, which right now is about 70 zloty. That means you’re sending an extra 40 zloty. One way to look at this is that you could spend $46 to send $11 to Poland ($35 bank fee plus $11 to the archive), or $30 to send $25 to Poland ($5 Xoom fee and $25 to the archive). Of course the Xoom option sends more than twice as much money for less overall cost to you. In this case, since you’re sending more money I would just ask for more records. Look up what other records the archive has, and ask them to look for other records connected to your family. It’s not a perfect situation, but usually you’ll probably be order more records and it won’t matter as much.

One useful tool I can recommend using before entering the bank information into whatever service you end up using, is xe.com’s IBAN Decoder. If you look at the bank information given by the archive above, there is a long string of numbers that follow the two-letter code for Poland. There is actually a special way to format that number which you will likely need when entering the bank account information. If you enter the string:

PL 47 101013390016612231000000

it will return:
Your IBAN Number Properly formatted PL47 1010 1339 0016 6122 3100 0000
ISO Country Code PL(Poland)
IBAN Check Digits 47
Bank Code 10101339
Account Number 0016612231000000
Transit Number 10101339

This makes entering the data into whatever fields your bank or other service asks for much easier.

Finding Other Records in Poland

How do you know what archives are actually available for the town you’re researching? JRI-Poland has not indexed every record, and doesn’t have many records that are not vital records. Many other records exist, such as census records, voter lists, notary records, etc.

There are basically two ways to find out what records exist for a given town. First there is Miriam Weiner’s Routes to Roots Foundation. If you click on ‘Archive Database’ on the left menu and then ‘Archive Documents’ under Search on the right, you’re brought to the search page. If, to continue our example, you search for Tyszowce, you’d find there are 14 record groups. These are spread among archives in Tyszowce, Zamosc and Lublin, as well as one record set at the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw. Record types include Birth, Marriage, Death, Voter Lists, Kahal/Jewish, Tax Lists and Notary Records. Sometimes a single record type (such as Birth) are spread among many different archives. In this instance, birth records for 1826-1875 are in Lublin, for 1876-1897 are in Zamosc, and for the years 1898-1915; 1920-1923; 1925-1926; 1928-1938 are in Tyszowce itself.

Let’s say you want to search for Notary Records. Those records are in the Zamosc archives, so you draft a letter similar to the above letter and send it to them, asking how much it costs to search for records. As there is no index, you have no idea how many copies you might receive, so perhaps ask the archive if you can wait to pay until after the search is complete. If not, perhaps send some extra money to cover a few copies and ask them to charge you if the copies exceed what you send only. In the above example, you could ask the archive to search the notary records to use up the extra money you sent.

The second resource you can use to find other records for your town is the Polish State Archives’ PRADZIAD database. The search interface is in English (if you click on the British flag) but the results will be in Polish. Google Translate is useful here – you can use the built-in translation feature of the Google Chrome browser, or the ability to translate pages on the fly in Firefox or IE using the Google Toolbar. Thus you can translate the results. You can choose the types of records in the search, but I suggest just doing a full search on the town. If you were to search Tyszowce in this interface, you would find 22 record groups. Many of these overlap with the Routes to Roots list, but some of these are religion-specific and not Jewish, so probably the Routes to Roots list is more comprehensive. While the PRADZIAD list is primarily, birth, marriage and death records, the Routes to Roots list also had voter lists, notary records, etc. However, if you look closely you’ll notice that there are some relevant records listed in the PRADZIAD list that are not in the Routes to Roots list, specifically Birth records from 1810-1825, which are not listed in Routes to Roots.

Basically, when looking for records not indexed in JRI-Poland, make sure to search both Routes to Roots and PRADZIAD.

Conclusion 

So in conclusion, there are three main categories of records – records in state archives indexed by JRI-Poland, records on LDS microfilm indexed by JRI-Poland, and records in archives not indexed by JRI-Poland (which you can find and then contact the archives to find the specific records). There is a fourth category I haven’t discussed, which is LDS microfilms not indexed by JRI-Poland. Hopefully this category will disappear over time. In most cases those records are also in the archives, so you’ll still find them by searching the archives.

I hope this summary was useful. If you find any mistakes, please let me know in the comments. If you have recommendation for other ways to get records, please also post to the comments. Also feel free to recommend professional researchers you’ve used that can help others with the process.

Giving Back Through Indexing

If you’ve done any genealogical research in past dozen years you’re probably amazed at how much information is available online. The Internet has certainly changed how genealogy is done, even if the number of records online is still a tiny percentage of what records are actually out there in the real world. Yet, have you ever wondered how all this information made its way online? Certainly finding a hand-written birth certificate or census record of your distant ancestor in the 19th century is not something that happens without a human being spending the time to decipher the handwriting and enter all the relevant information into a database. Yet how do these databases get created?

In the world of Jewish genealogy, probably the biggest project to index records is JRI-Poland, which has put indexes of over four million Jewish birth, marriage and death records from Poland (and places that were once part of Poland) online. JRI-Poland doesn’t actually put the records online, but an index to those records. Usually the information in that index contains the most important details that you would find if you could view the actual record, such as the name of the person, sometimes the names of the parents, associated dates, etc. although on the flip side, without seeing the actual records you can never be sure that all the information is 100% accurate and you don’t know what was left out (sometimes records have notes written on them that contain information important to genealogists). JRI-Poland works by locating relevant records in archives across Poland, figuring out how many records exist for each town covered in the archives, then soliciting donations for the indexing projects for each town. The idea is that if you know your family is from a specific town, then you’ll likely contribute to have the records indexed for that town. In their favor, if a town has a lot of records to index (thus costing more to index) there are usually more descendants of those people to help contribute to the indexing projects. Once the money is raised for a town project, JRI-Poland makes copies of all the index pages from the archive and then pays people in Poland to create the electronic indexes of the records. Why use locals instead of crowdsourcing the indexing like other sites do? I think the main issue is that records from Poland from the 19th century and the early 20th century (when most of these records come from) can be written in a mix of Polish, German and Russian. It all pretty much depends on who was in control of the particular town at the time the records were created. Poland was divided among the various empires in the area multiple times the same town might have been under the control of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (which generally used German for records) or Russia (which obviously used Russian for records). Finding descendants of the people from those towns that speak those languages and is difficult to do. In order to make the indexing easier and to insure there are fewer mistakes, JRI-Poland finds local Poles who know the languages they need, and pays them to do the indexing. So your contribution in the process is fairly simple, pay the money.

There are other ways that online databases get created. Sometimes individuals or groups take it upon themselves to put either records or indexes of records online. Sometimes people just post their contributions on their own web pages, sometimes they contribute them to existing online projects (like JewishGen) and sometimes they coordinate their efforts through sites set up for such projects, like USGenWeb or the Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild (ISTG). These sites help volunteers to coordinate their efforts and bring records online, where a set of local vital records on USGenWeb, or a ship passenger manifest on ISTG. Sometimes these kinds of records are difficult to locate, so indexes to the indexes pop up, like Census Finder.

One very good example of a volunteer site is GenTeam.at, which indexes Austrian records. As a group they have indexed over 2.7 million records from across Austria, including hundreds of thousands of Jewish vital records. The records are all indexed by volunteers and the site is free to use (although you must register first).

Another way databases or indexes of records get created is by companies that make money from making the records available online. These companies spend a lot of money in acquiring records, scanning records and creating indexes of these records so that they are searchable on their sites. These companies either have experts in their employ who create the indexes of the records, or pay people to do the work for them (usually overseas where labor is cheaper). Examples of web sites that do this are Ancestry.com, Footnote.com (recently bought by Ancestry.com), WorldVitalRecords.com, etc. Footnote.com, for example, made a deal with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to gain access to many of the files they have (such as naturalization records) and make them available online. Sometimes these sites will let you search their records for free, but if you want to actually see the records and the information in them, you need to join the website and pay a membership fee. There obviously is money to be made in this area as the large companies each have over a million subscribers each paying them money monthly or annually. In these cases, your membership money goes towards their indexing efforts, but not in a directed fashion of course. You’re not contributing to an indexing effort as much as the company’s bottom line, but in the end you do get access to new records.

I won’t go into detail now about the role of genealogy in the Mormon Church, but needless to say it is important on a religious level, and the church has invested a lot of time, effort and money into collecting records from all over the world. They have collected billions of records from countries across the globe, generally on microfilm, and keep those microfilms in a secure underground archive in Utah. From the original microfilms kept in that archive, copies are made available in their Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake City, and in Family History Centers (FHC) across the US and across the globe. For decades the only real way to access these records was to go to the FHL in Salt Lake City, or go to an FHC near you and request access to specific microfilms, which if they didn’t have they could borrow from the FHL. Accessing these records were difficult for another reason, which is that if you didn’t speak the language the records were written in, you would need to hire someone who spoke that language to go to the FHL or an FHC and sit in front of a microfilm reader and find th records you were looking for (if they exist at all). Obviously this was (and still is) an expensive proposition.

Of course, with those billions of records on microfilm it was only logical that people would start asking to make the records available online. The problem putting them online is not only to scan all those microfilms, but to have people create the indexes that will make the records searchable. The Family History Library’s online presence is known as FamilySearch.org, and it is through that web site that Mormons as part of their religious duty collaborate in creating their own family trees, but also where the Mormon Church has started to make those billions of records available online, for free. With such a massive undertaking, FamilySearch.org had to come up with a way to find help in creating the indexes for all their records – what they came up with is FamilySearch Indexing, where they allow anyone who has access to a computer and Internet to help them index their massive collection of records. FamilySearch claims that over 300,000 volunteers have indexed over 7 Million records since 1996. This year they were trying to index 200,000 records (with only a few days left in the year they’re around 185,000 records).

To help out yourself, you start by signing up on their site, and then downloading a computer program which lets you do the actual indexing. The program lets you specify the difficulty of the records you’re willing to work on (easy ones are recent records typed or written in block print, harder ones can be handwritten in a fancy script and be written a hundred of fifty years ago when handwriting was different than it is today) and what languages you can understand. Once you’ve set up the program it runs your through some easy sample records so you get how it works, and then you can start indexing records by downloading them in batches. Batches are collections of records that make up a kind of work unit. You work on all the records in the batch and when you’re done, you can submit them for review and get another batch of records to work on. A single batch might have only a few records to transcribe if they’re difficult, or perhaps dozens of records if the records are all listed on one page and are easy to read.

As you index more and more batches of records, you earn points. Generally, easy records earn you one point and harder records can earn you more points. Mainly, the points are just a way to keep track of how much work you have contributed to FamilySearch Indexing. The site does offer a Premium Membership to volunteers who earn more than 900 points in a calendar quarter. This gets you a Premium Membership for the rest of that quarter and the whole next quarter. FamilySearch estimates one would earn 900 points a quarter by spending about half an hour a week working on indexing. What does a Premium Membership get you? Well, it seems that while FamilySearch.org owns a lot of the records they put online, they don’t own ALL of the records they make searchable online. In some cases they need to pay the owners of these records whenever someone accesses the image of the actual record. As such, in order to see those records, you need to be a Premium Member, either because of your records indexing or because of membership in an organization that sponsors FamilySearch.org (such as the Mormon church). If you do find a record that is restricted to Premium Members only, you could of course index 900 records that calendar quarter to gain access to it, although sometimes you may find that the record exists elsewhere and just knowing it exists is enough to send you to another site to find the actual records without doing that much work.

I would say, however, that if you use FamilySearch.org, which for what you can access is always free, you should think about contributing to their efforts by doing some indexing yourself. It doesn’t cost you anything but your time, and the next time you find a record on FamilySearch.org that is connected to your family, just remember that the file was probably made searchable by a user like you who contributed their time to indexing.

As one of this blog’s focuses is Jewish genealogy, and there has been some controversy with the Mormon Church and the Jewish community concerning the Mormon practice of posthumous baptism of their ancestors (some of whom were Jewish), and even the posthumous baptism of people not related to the church members, in particular famous people – including, for example, Anne Frank, who has apparently been posthumously baptized at least nine separate times, I want to point to an overview of this whole topic at JewishGen: The Issue of The Mormon Baptisms of Jewish Holocaust Victims And Other Jewish Dead. The issue is going to come up eventually, so in the context of discussing FamilySearch in this post I figure now is as good a time as ever to bring this issue up. I’m not going to dwell on the whole issue, except to point out that even though there have been several attempts between Mormons and Jews to resolve this issue, it continues. There are voices on different sides of the issue – those that believe that the very idea of posthumous baptisms of Jews is sacrilegious, and those who view the religious rites of a different religion as irrelevant to their own. This fight has engendered strong words on both sides, and frankly I have mixed feelings about the whole thing. Certainly many Jewish genealogists have worked hard to make sure whatever information they have on their family is not made available online (such as on public family tree web sites) in order to prevent the possibility that their research might lead to one of their ancestors being baptized posthumously. In this way Mormon genealogy efforts have made Jewish genealogy more difficult due to the added security and protection many Jewish genealogists have implemented with their family trees, yet on the other hand FamilySearch.org has made many very useful records available to all researchers for free, and that has helped all genealogists, including Jewish ones. I think every non-Mormon needs to make a decision on their own what they feel about this issue, and how closely they want to deal with FamilySearch considering that it is a branch of the Church of Latter Day Saints. As I’ve shown above, I don’t think there is a problem to use FamilySearch.org to search for records, and I’ve encouraged people to give back by helping index new records, but beyond that interaction, each person needs make up their own mind about sharing additional information with FamilySearch.org and their parent organization, the Church of Latter Day Saints.